April 14, 2017No Comments

From Insight To Action

Today you hear alot about big data, but is anyone really using it to create business actionable intellegence?  In today's fast paced social market marketers should look at customer behavior from different perspectives and understand behavior both in the past as well as in the present to drive positive results in the future. Understanding the historical, recent and as-it-happens customer data helps the marketer to create relevant and truly compelling offers that drive conversion in the moment. In other words, don’t give customers a reason to leave the site. 

In order to go from the deluge of data to actioable ideas it is important to understand the differences between historical, recent and as- it-happens customer data.  In the retail world it is critical in order to move forward from gathering insights to taking meaningful action on those insights. 

I start with the Four R's of Data Relevance:

  1. DATA RECENCY How current is the data from the time of the event and how important is it to know what is happening immediately?
  2. DATA RETENTION How far back does the data set go and how critical is it to know what the history of the data provides?
  3. DATA RICHNESS How much information about the visitor profile is available and how does this help the decision-making process?
  4. DATA REALIZATION How will the data be used or consumed? Will it be used to develop reports, dashboard or drive marketing programs? Will it be consumed through APIs, or extracted for used in a data warehouse?

The Four R’s become important to the online retailers as they adopt digital intelligence to drive results. 

 

 

 

From Insight To Action via @jpenabickley

April 14, 2014No Comments

ON: Behind Dibs Film Fest Big Idea

While the idea
was simple - The Dibs Film Festival was not an easy production.

As many of you know I
gave birth to this idea at TracyLocke, then in between gigs (my move to
Wunderman) I spearheaded the digital, broadcast and out of home
creative along with writing styling of Snack's Jennifer Leuzzi

There were many production and technical partners involved.  Some of
those partners were great.. and others not so great.  MTV was a great
media partner. As expected they have delivered eyeballs, buzz and
clicks. Where they fell down was their digital technology production.

Dibs Film Festival Players
Brand Conversation Strategy, Experience Design + Writing = BlueFusion
Retail Strategy & Creative, Account and Project Management = TracyLocke
Flash Interface Development & Banner Advertising = ID Society
Site Technology + Hosting = MTVN's Digital Fusion Group - outsourced to Reality Digital
Widget Technology & Distribution = Gigya

Here is a soft copy of the Expereince Design document I commonly refer to as the temporal specification.

The you add in Flash Production partners ID Society and technology partner MTV's Digital Fusion Group who outsourced their work to Reality Digital in CA.  Widget distribution duty was Gigya - who as usual delivered a superb piece of technology called Wildfire.

All managed by talented account group at TracyLocke in Dallas - BlueFusion delivered cohesive digital creative that was guided by a temporal specification that was supposed to be implemented by the ID Society and MTV's Digital Fusion Group / Reality Digital.  In the end what became clear was that the choice of Reality Digital for anything more than a video mashup up tool
creator was a mistake. 

When the deal was done MTV Digital Fusion group
was supposed to be able to  be a backend partner for more than the
video mashup tool but for the entire site. (video editing and sharing,
Sweepstakes, Widgets)  In the end the site was launched.  But to date
many pieces of the sites functionality were not implemented.  Look at
the temporal spec and see which pieces were left out of the equation.

ON: Behind Dibs Film Fest Big Idea via @jpenabickley

April 1, 2012No Comments

Help us #MakeTheStage at @InternetWeek

Logo_iwny_lgI love spring!  Not just because it symbolizes a re-birth each year, but because it's a run up to the best internet & mobile shows. First up, Internet Week which runs from May 14 to May 21.  I will be there from the opening party to the closing ceremonies.

We have a great topic this year: The Post-Digital Age

As many of your know, over the years, I have demonstrated that all media is social with the right idea. Now it's time to discuss the greater ramifications of this to the brand world and the agency business. 

Given that all customers are digital & social -- now the day of the Digital & Social AOR is quickly dying and all agencies are expected to be digital. From media planning to creative the game has completely changed new agency models are winning big business with Transmedia story telling and hard core business results. When the old ways begin to give way to something yet to be imagined, we have a choice. Live in the past or get down to the business of imaging the future. What will you do and how will you organize around your the brands you represent in this new post digital age??

I could use your help to #MakeTheStage at this years @InternetWeek. Vote thumbs up for The Post-Digital Age at http://shar.es/rbWQY

Then if your really a cool cat you will get others to vote too.  Help us spread the word by dropping a line (preferably this one: Help us #MakeTheStage at this years @InternetWeek. Vote thumbs up for The Post-Digital Age at http://shar.es/rbWQY ) to your subscribers, friends and followers to vote for The Post-Digital Age at http://shar.es/rbWQY on facebook, twitter, tumblr or what ever platform fits your fancy.

I look forward to seeing you all there - I'll be the one wearing sunglasses inside.

Help us #MakeTheStage at @InternetWeek via @jpenabickley

November 28, 20111 Comment

Gamification 101: In a world where everyone [millennials] gets a trophy, Are you in the game?

It's all the rage!  But what is it exactly?  Lets start with a basic definition:

ga∙mi∙fi∙ca∙tion [gay-muh-fi-kay-shuhn]: integrating game dynamics into your site, service, community, content or campaign, in order to drive participation.

The use of game dynamics into marketing is not new.  It's popularity has grown in recent years as a strategy for influencing and motivating groups of people. Brand marketers are just starting to realize the power it has to improve customer engagement, build loyalty, and incent employees and partners to perform.  In a world where everyone [millennials] gets a trophy, how will your brand engage your customers?

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Conceptually, gamification has the potential to solve a variety of problems outside the business world as well, in areas such as:

  • Health & Wellness: healthcare cost containment, obesity programs, smoking cessation...
  • Education & Training: e-learning, corporate and vocational training, online testing...
  • Public Policy & Government: education reform, climate change, welfare reform.

The technique can encourage people to perform chores that they ordinarily consider boring, such as completing surveys, shopping, filling out tax forms, or reading web sites.

But just like anything in business life you must beware of all the HYPE! Understanding how and why gamification works, in what contexts it is most effective, and what the limits are of this approach will be highly useful in sorting out the useful bits.  In the next few posts I hope to help provide a basic foundation and definition for the concept of gamification.

At its core, gamification applies the mechanics of gaming to non- game activities to change people’s behavior. When used in a business context, gamification is the process of integrating game dynamics (and game mechanics) into a website, business service, online community, content portal, or marketing campaign in order to drive participation and engagement.

Increasing Participation and Engagement
The overall goal of gamification is to engage with your customers and get them to participate, share and interact in some activity or community. A particularly compelling, dynamic, and sustained gamification experience can be used to accomplish a variety of business goals.

Game Mechanics & Game Dynamics
These two terms are closely related and sometimes used interchangeably. For our purposes, game mechanics are the various actions, behaviors, and control mechanisms that are used to “gamify” an activity — the aspects that, taken together, create a compelling, engaging user experience. The compelling, motivational nature of this experience is, in turn, the result of desires and motivations we call game dynamics.

Game mechanics include:

  • Points
  • Levels
  • Challenges
  • Virtual goods and spaces
  • Leaderboards
  • Gifts and charity

Game dynamics include:

  • Reward Status
  • Achievement
  • Self-expression
  • Competition
  • Altruism

The rise of location-based platforms such as Facebook's "Place" feature, Foursquare (social network), and Gowalla have made a number gamification techniques mainstream.

  • Achievement "badges"
  • Achievement levels
  • "leader boards"
  • A progress bar or other visual meter to indicate how close people are to completing a task a company is trying to encourage, such as completing a social networking profile or earning a frequent shopper loyalty award.
  • Virtual currency
  • Systems for awarding, redeeming, trading, gifting, and otherwise exchanging points
  • Challenges between users
  • Embedding small casual games within other activities.

Humans have been playing games in various forms since the days of the caveman, and competition is deeply ingrained in the human psyche. Given this wide acceptance of gaming and the emergence of the internet, people have become more open to game mechanics in other parts of their lives. As a result, “gamification” is becoming a powerful tool that organizations teach, persuade, and motivate people.

Whether it is Frequent Flyer Programs, Samsung Nation, Nike and iPod's Nike+ or Starbucks or American Express & Foursquare we all at play. 

[Sources: October 2007, Bunchball; September 2010, Badgeville, Beyond Gamification: 7 Core Concepts for Creating Compelling Products]

Gamification 101: In a world where everyone [millennials] gets a trophy, Are you in the game? via @jpenabickley

March 27, 2010No Comments

ON: Flipping The Funnel

Have you ever stood in a new business pitch and wanted to sneeze "bullshit" when you saw the old marketing funnel pop up?  I think the most confusing explanations of the new marketing paradigm is this one Forrester put out a few years back.

Marketing-funnel
 

 The traditional funnel was built on four consumer behaviors: Awareness - Interest - Desire and Action.  

If you’re like most marketers, you’ve been spending a lot of time and money trying to shovel more and more attention into the top of the funnel. After all, if you can expose your idea or product to enough people, you can afford to buy more attention, to run more ads, to put more people into the top.  This method takes a ton of time and a ton more money.

What's wrong with the funnel?
If your a brand with a little money you have to be much more focused with the way that you spend your media dollars.  All marketing including your CRM programs are created to get people to the purchase your product.  I would argue that there is no linear path to loyalty.  The one constant is continued choice.  

Screen shot 2010-03-27 at 10.27.38 PM  Loyalty / CRM or relationship marketing in the conversation age is all about getting existing customers (those brand evangelists) to get new customers.  

My friend @jaffejuice says we should Flip the Funnel - and I agree!

Here are some excerpts @jaffejuice's new book Flip the Funnel which is a MUST BUY for any strategist, marketer or creative working in this digitally converged age.

It's out of date. Come on - people aren't predictable, linear, rational or sequential beings. They probably never were. Though the four steps make sense in theory from a sequential or even chronological standpoint, the buying game is very different in reality. In a word-of-mouth and word-of-mouse led world, the process of researching and buying is decidedly non-linear, and it's likely that some steps are skipped altogether in an always correcting, efficient and evolving marketplace.

It's lopsided or out of proportion. The reason why the funnel is wider at one end and narrower at the other is not only because of the number of people that are theoretically present at each step, but arguably because of the amount of money spent or available at each step. If you think about it, shouldn't we be spending more money against qualified prospective buyers, versus shots in the dark at bagging a random stranger? Of course we should. 

It's oversimplified. There's a fine line between simplifying something complex down to a root or core state, and oversimplifying it to a fault. The marketing funnel does not factor in at least three critical components associated with the qualification process; and even more intriguing is that all three are consumer-driven or initiated, starkly contrasting against the incumbent steps which are all marketing-centric or oriented: Research, Trial, and Satisfaction.
 
Research: Search is just the tip of the iceberg - a portal into an aggressive and proactive due-diligence process. Consumers today are vociferous researchers; they will do what they can to make informed decisions that disintermediate marketing misdirection, hyperbole, overpromise and hype. They'll also spend increasing amounts of time talking with peers, colleagues, friends and family members, as well as interacting with newly formed "acquaintances" in the social networking and digital community arenas.

Trial: Try before you buy is a crucial solution to hesitation, inability to commit, or indecision. And just like search was the tip of the research iceberg, so too is couponing or sampling the tip of the trial step. Often times, trial is indirect or inferred; for example, a movie review today is independently and representatively vetted, endorsed and validated by a community of "me's" and "you's." When trial becomes an existential experience, there's no longer danger of seeing a bad movie.

Satisfaction: Interestingly enough (if we're using Wikipedia as the gold standard), this is the only missing component of A.I.D.A. that tends to make it into conversations about the consumer qualification process. Perhaps it's because it slots neatly into an acronym (A.I.D.A.S.), and who doesn't love the convenience of a neat-sounding acronym? Satisfaction is the one clue that the funnel is not quite done yet ...

Human beings have become increasingly unpredictable mammals. Expecting them to go through any kind of process (especially one we created for them) with a degree of standardization and/or certainty is a dangerous assumption to make. With incessant distractions, constantly new propositions and exciting ways of transacting with a company, it's no longer valid to bank on a predictable path to purchase. Instead, witness a more realistic behavior, mixed with accelerated, skipped and even repeated steps or pathways to purchase.

What happens to the chosen few that make it through to the other end of the funnel? They fall to their grisly deaths in the vertical drop of attrition. Put less grandiosely and more pragmatically: The funnel is purely an acquisition phase, and does not continue to retention. Perhaps if there were a bucket underneath, we'd be a little more reassured that there was some kind of safety net built into an incredibly costly (or risky) game of conquesting.

Even if the funnel were "closed" insofar that there was a destination or goal, it would still be incomplete; the end point would still be a dead end. The marketing funnel produces customers - but then does nothing with them. With so much effort extended to produce a priceless transaction, it is almost inconceivable that we all but abandon our intensity thereafter. Perhaps we're locked into a cruel version of Groundhog Day when we immediately are taken back to the beginning, only to have to repeat our entire marketing mating dance with (as history has shown us) barely any new lessons learned and diminishing success rates.

This book takes aim at the heart of the open social model.  Get Flip the Funnel  at Amazon or Barnes & Noble

ON: Flipping The Funnel via @jpenabickley

March 27, 2010No Comments

ON: Flipping The Funnel

Have you ever stood in a new business pitch and wanted to sneeze "bullshit" when you saw the old marketing funnel pop up?  I think the most confusing explanations of the new marketing paradigm is this one Forrester put out a few years back.

Marketing-funnel
 

 The traditional funnel was built on four consumer behaviors: Awareness - Interest - Desire and Action.  

If you’re like most marketers, you’ve been spending a lot of time and money trying to shovel more and more attention into the top of the funnel. After all, if you can expose your idea or product to enough people, you can afford to buy more attention, to run more ads, to put more people into the top.  This method takes a ton of time and a ton more money.

What's wrong with the funnel?
If your a brand with a little money you have to be much more focused with the way that you spend your media dollars.  All marketing including your CRM programs are created to get people to the purchase your product.  I would argue that there is no linear path to loyalty.  The one constant is continued choice.  

Screen shot 2010-03-27 at 10.27.38 PM  Loyalty / CRM or relationship marketing in the conversation age is all about getting existing customers (those brand evangelists) to get new customers.  

My friend @jaffejuice says we should Flip the Funnel - and I agree!

Here are some excerpts @jaffejuice's new book Flip the Funnel which is a MUST BUY for any strategist, marketer or creative working in this digitally converged age.

It's out of date. Come on - people aren't predictable, linear, rational or sequential beings. They probably never were. Though the four steps make sense in theory from a sequential or even chronological standpoint, the buying game is very different in reality. In a word-of-mouth and word-of-mouse led world, the process of researching and buying is decidedly non-linear, and it's likely that some steps are skipped altogether in an always correcting, efficient and evolving marketplace.

It's lopsided or out of proportion. The reason why the funnel is wider at one end and narrower at the other is not only because of the number of people that are theoretically present at each step, but arguably because of the amount of money spent or available at each step. If you think about it, shouldn't we be spending more money against qualified prospective buyers, versus shots in the dark at bagging a random stranger? Of course we should. 

It's oversimplified. There's a fine line between simplifying something complex down to a root or core state, and oversimplifying it to a fault. The marketing funnel does not factor in at least three critical components associated with the qualification process; and even more intriguing is that all three are consumer-driven or initiated, starkly contrasting against the incumbent steps which are all marketing-centric or oriented: Research, Trial, and Satisfaction.
 
Research: Search is just the tip of the iceberg - a portal into an aggressive and proactive due-diligence process. Consumers today are vociferous researchers; they will do what they can to make informed decisions that disintermediate marketing misdirection, hyperbole, overpromise and hype. They'll also spend increasing amounts of time talking with peers, colleagues, friends and family members, as well as interacting with newly formed "acquaintances" in the social networking and digital community arenas.

Trial: Try before you buy is a crucial solution to hesitation, inability to commit, or indecision. And just like search was the tip of the research iceberg, so too is couponing or sampling the tip of the trial step. Often times, trial is indirect or inferred; for example, a movie review today is independently and representatively vetted, endorsed and validated by a community of "me's" and "you's." When trial becomes an existential experience, there's no longer danger of seeing a bad movie.

Satisfaction: Interestingly enough (if we're using Wikipedia as the gold standard), this is the only missing component of A.I.D.A. that tends to make it into conversations about the consumer qualification process. Perhaps it's because it slots neatly into an acronym (A.I.D.A.S.), and who doesn't love the convenience of a neat-sounding acronym? Satisfaction is the one clue that the funnel is not quite done yet ...

Human beings have become increasingly unpredictable mammals. Expecting them to go through any kind of process (especially one we created for them) with a degree of standardization and/or certainty is a dangerous assumption to make. With incessant distractions, constantly new propositions and exciting ways of transacting with a company, it's no longer valid to bank on a predictable path to purchase. Instead, witness a more realistic behavior, mixed with accelerated, skipped and even repeated steps or pathways to purchase.

What happens to the chosen few that make it through to the other end of the funnel? They fall to their grisly deaths in the vertical drop of attrition. Put less grandiosely and more pragmatically: The funnel is purely an acquisition phase, and does not continue to retention. Perhaps if there were a bucket underneath, we'd be a little more reassured that there was some kind of safety net built into an incredibly costly (or risky) game of conquesting.

Even if the funnel were "closed" insofar that there was a destination or goal, it would still be incomplete; the end point would still be a dead end. The marketing funnel produces customers - but then does nothing with them. With so much effort extended to produce a priceless transaction, it is almost inconceivable that we all but abandon our intensity thereafter. Perhaps we're locked into a cruel version of Groundhog Day when we immediately are taken back to the beginning, only to have to repeat our entire marketing mating dance with (as history has shown us) barely any new lessons learned and diminishing success rates.

This book takes aim at the heart of the open social model.  Get Flip the Funnel  at Amazon or Barnes & Noble

ON: Flipping The Funnel via @jpenabickley
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