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January 18, 2016No Comments

Reinventing The Wheel

The Automotive & Aerospace industries are one of the most exciting spaces that you could be working in when it comes to Experience Design. The forces of change are strong and our incentives to reinvent the wheel have never been more noble or more tied to the entrepreneurialism and invention that brought about the second industrial revolution. From the first wheel to our first footsteps on the moon, our quest to move further and faster has been limited only by the technology to power our dreams.

Now, speeding into a post-digital era, the forces of sustainability, urbanization, and new technologies that defy the very concept of time and space are reshaping how we move all over again. Welcome to the third industrial revolution.

Last Tuesday our announcement at North American International Auto Show was just the beginning of how we will change the relationship between people and their cars.  Join IBMiX on this journey as we explore and lead the innovations and ideas — once relegated to science fiction — that use the Internet of Things, Renewable Energy, Data and Cognitive Experience Design to bring forth a new driving reality.

For me, the future is not some far off date 5 years from now. It is the ongoing present, which our IBMiX Experience Design teams are sprinting towards with agility and industrial strength design thinking – Join us as we Reinvent The Wheel.

Enjoy the trends we believe are shaping mobility in 2016:
Download and Read IBMiX’s Reinventing The Wheel

Download PDF: IBMiX_ReinventingTheWheel_FutureOfMobility_TrendPaper

June 5, 2009No Comments

ON: A Creative Guide To Brand Building

It's not easy.  If it was, everyone would do it!  This presentation was created to help marketers, art directors, writers and experience designers focus on the details when building or pitching brand work.

ON: A Creative Guide To Brand Building via @jpenabickley

January 17, 2009No Comments

ON: Advertising’s Evolution

This is a great video created by ad agency Scholz & Friends.  The animation details the dramatic shift in the marketing reality over the last 100 years. What I love about this video is that asks an important question that we should be asking of the brands we work with.  “Don’t you have something interesting to say?"

 http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2753002&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1
Scholz & Friends: "Dramatic shift in marketing reality" from Michael Reissinger on Vimeo.

After years of “crafting messages” to appeal a mass
consumer market many brands have lost their ability to do or say
anything interesting. Te products and services that will survive the conversation economy will be companies that stand for
things more meaningful than just promoting the consumption of their
products.

ON: Advertising’s Evolution via @jpenabickley

January 17, 2009No Comments

ON: Advertising’s Evolution

This is a great video created by ad agency Scholz & Friends.  The animation details the dramatic shift in the marketing reality over the last 100 years. What I love about this video is that asks an important question that we should be asking of the brands we work with.  “Don’t you have something interesting to say?"

 http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2753002&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1
Scholz & Friends: "Dramatic shift in marketing reality" from Michael Reissinger on Vimeo.

After years of “crafting messages” to appeal a mass
consumer market many brands have lost their ability to do or say
anything interesting. Te products and services that will survive the conversation economy will be companies that stand for
things more meaningful than just promoting the consumption of their
products.

ON: Advertising’s Evolution via @jpenabickley

May 4, 20082 Comments

ON: Our Business Has Changed – Have You?

The tide has turned. Brands teams that have allowed their brands to be touched by consumers have won and have upped the marketing ante.  Consumer generated content, products ideas and conversations are not going away – as a matter of fact it is in full swing and marketers and creative’s who are using it – are inspiring deeper connections and relationships with their consumers.

This week I will focus my posts on the best practices that have lead to the best work which always leads to greater profitability for agencies and their clients.

This time last year I predicted that the agencies which used words like “traditional” and “interactive” to describe themselves would be the dinosaurs of 2008.  And indeed they have become just that.

 
If you are living in the here is now, you are focusing past the latest tactical hype and having relevant, insightful conversations with your client’s consumers.

In my article “All Media Is Social” I stumbled upon on to a theme that affects the way agencies work with their clients.  That theme was that in partnership with our clients we needed to become conversation architects.   In David Armano’s Conversation Architect theory he expresses the need for creative’s to refocus their work in digital eco-systems.  I believe that it has broader implications.  Its not just digital, its about where and when the consumer wants it.  Brands like Unilever's Dove has proved that to be true.

Last year at OMMA, I met Janet Kestin, the creative mastermind behind Dove’s evolution, she told me that capturing lightening in a bottle was as easy as launching a conversation starter that began with a set of consumer insights.  What Janet artfully did was tap in to all woman’s desire to let our inner beauty shine. The evolution piece was one way to continue re-enforcing a three year campaign which shed light on the nasty truth we all needed to be reminded of so that we can go forth and have real beauty as real woman.  The genius behind it is that Janet positioned Dove as the product that allowed woman to let their Real Beauty shine.  The one thing that she did share with the OMMA audience was that Unilever did not easily embrace this part of the consumer conversation.  It was seen as less of a risk as the video was a fraction of their typical creative production budgets  for TV spots (125k Canadian Dollars). This portion of the conversation (one part of the campaign for real beauty) was fuelled by heavy public relations, celebrity endorsements like Oprah and Rosie as well as a little known mass vehicle called YouTube.  What I learned from Janet is that clients and their consumer’s are not buying tactics – they are buying ideas.

The only way for agencies and marketing organizations to become Conversations Architects is to gently guide our clients with us on this journey.  An agency, General, Direct or Digital must have a partnership that leads to broader stewardship of the brand to deliver on true consumer conversations.  The one thing that has not and will not change is the fact that the agencies primary business is the relationship with our clients.  With out them we do not have a business.  The client agency relationship continues to be a partnership, which fuels our bottom lines.

Clients know they need to change – So how do you frame that change? You must be strategic and give market case studies that prove how great brands create and inspire brand loyalty in a world where all media is social and we the people have become the medium.

I often have been accused of being a bit of a Polly-Anna when it comes to how I view the agency world and the way we work collaboratively with clients.  But I sincerely believe in the philosophy that tight-knit groups who have overlapping areas expertise as well as specific role functions can act as swat teams within large organizations to bring about smarter work and bigger ideas.  When you work smart you get smart work. (and inevitably make more money together)

We are all creative

From the relationship leaders in account to the insights strategists in planning to the writers, designers and information architects in creative to the business logic and server engineers in technology to data analysts in analytics – WE ARE ALL CREATIVE.   And we are all responsible for the consumer experience.

Now seat our clients at that table for briefings, brainstorms and tissue sessions and what you get is a cohesive SWAT (Special Weapons And Tactics) team.   

Each one of us comes to the table with an arsenal experiences and expertise in executing tactics that can act as Brand’s secret weapons. We are all experts in our fields but when we come together in SWAT team we become a force to be reckoned with.

I know that it sounds like utopia, but what I have found is that it leads is a rich relationship with your clients and their consumers. And more importantly, it leads to more profitable agency relationships.

Where Do You Start?
In a world where all media is social we must begin by identifying our target consumer and learning about how they live, what they do, why they do it and what they want. Once you have formulated the SWAT team that includes your client this should be the first step.

This is easy to do… The data is out there, no matter where you or what you subscribe to – Forrester, eMarketer, Simmons, ComScore, Nielson or Intelligence - any combination of these sources will get the answers to the basic questions.

Without answering those basic questions, how might one begin a relevant conversation with consumers?  Imagine going to a networking event where you know nothing about the tribal passion that people are networking around.  Without these consumer insights all your tactics will act as incredibly expensive cold calls.  Cold calls are not the acts of marketers – they are the acts of sales departments.  Even in this day of amplified technology, marketing is still part science and part art.

The best consumer conversations start with right consumer insights.  Once you have that down now its time to brief the creative team.  The best briefs do not merely happen on paper they kick off with the insights, the support points and product innovations and then turn into brainstorms.  The best briefings include the account team, planners, creative’s and the client. When you combine those insights combined with the key brainstorm take-aways what you do is give your creative team the right foundation that will lead to the creation of big ideas that act as conversation starters for brands.

Once the results of those brainstorms are recorded now it is time for the creative team to go off and formulate a few cohesive big ideas.

When the creative team to heads off into their groups to create. What they should be delivering are ways to position ideas as conversations that create desire for a product or service.  Those campaign ideas / conversation starters, are the awareness drivers needed in pre-purchase cycle of any product or service.
When I create an idea I step back and look for what the audience desires.  If my idea quenches what they want most, then I have done my job.  Once I formulate the object of desire, then I work with tactical experts in media, technology and production to get the best in class ways to deliver the conversation starter through mass vehicles that give me maximum awareness that amplify the conversation.

Depending upon the audience consumption of media – you should tailor the idea to engage the consumer in the conversation through tactics that deliver a rich and innovative experience.  This can happen through consistently tailoring and deliver on the desires of the audience and drive sales.

Up Next – Streamlining The Agency Process

ON: Our Business Has Changed – Have You? via @jpenabickley

October 18, 2007No Comments

ON: Ciroc’s Celeb Brand

Its about who you know! Ciroc knows Puff Daddy. They are so close that Sean ‘P. Diddy’ Combs announced his appointment as Diageo’s Ciroc Vodka Brand Manager and CMO in an Ad Age Q&A interview this week.

The role is “too big for one title,” he told Ad Age, but, he added, “I’ll be taking the lead on all the things traditionally a CMO or a brand manager would do, just doing them my way. Marketing in a way that is truly unique.” - Source Ad Age

This is more than the typical product placement

Diddy is not just a spokesman. He has become the brand. Ciroc will be making more than an just appearance in his videos. He is both vested and invested in Diageo’s marketing objectives. This type of involvement will transcend the typical endorsement relationships. Before Diddy—a product and brand himself—launched his first marketing directive, he’s already a walking talking media channel for the Ciroc Vodka brand. Not your standard brand agent hire.

This big challenge will be how Diddy and Diageo will coexist. This joint endevour could prove to be a real life product placement that elevates a Brand to real celebrity status. Read the entire Ad Age article here.

Update 10/07/2008: First Campaign - Diddy Becomes The Chairman of The Ciroc Board
What I love about this move is that it breaks the mold and brings the brand into a true circle of celebrities. P. Diddy is to launched The Art of Celebration! Celebrate Life Responsibly! campaign.

http://broadbandsports.com/flv/bbs-xplayer.swf?n=20484

Diddy has brought the art of "sophisticated celebration" to life on the small screen for the only ultra-premium vodka. Shot in black and white at one of Sinatra's former California homes, the 15- and 30-second commercials depict Combs as a high-spirited host amidst a chic crowd during an impromptu private house party. Combs is serving CIROC while engaging with his modern-day "Rat Pack" entourage. Combs mingles, dances and jokes during the intimate party, before finally stealing a private moment to gaze into the night as the crowd enjoys a fun-filled evening inside.

I love the sell the sophisticated strategy employed here. Yet another game changer.

ON: Ciroc’s Celeb Brand via @jpenabickley

December 17, 2006No Comments

ON: Contest Invites Women to Submit 30-second Spots for New Cream Oil Body Wash

Picture_5_7

Unilever's Dove is joining the growing ranks of brands enlisting
consumers to do the work their ad agencies once did. It's asking "real
women" to create TV ads to run during the Academy Awards on ABC Feb.
25.

In an e-mail today to members of its online relationship-marketing
program, Dove began seeking entries for a 30-second ad to promote a new
product, Dove Cream Oil Body Wash.

The e-mail directs people to DoveCreamOil.com, a site hosted on Time
Warner's AOL, which provides online tools, artwork, photos and music
for creating ads, and also allows consumers to upload their own files.
"You don't need any special skills or experience," the e-mail says. 
Actress Sara Ramirez is also touting the program on tonight's "Access Hollywood."

Three finalists will win trips to a private Academy Awards viewing
party in Los Angeles, and the winning spot will run during the Academy
Awards broadcast. The contest is open only to women and, of course,
only to amateurs.

WPP Group's Ogilvy & Mather, Chicago, handles creative for the
brand, and MindShare, New York, handles media. Independent Edelman
Worldwide, New York, handles public relations.

ON: Contest Invites Women to Submit 30-second Spots for New Cream Oil Body Wash via @jpenabickley

December 7, 2006No Comments

ON:Meeting Oprah’s Product-Placement Gatekeeper

Harriet Seitler Is Where Creative Meets Business at Harpo Productions

Picture_1_16
Why you need to know her
: A brand doesn't get on "The Oprah
Winfrey Show" unless it gets by Ms. Seitler first. Having started at
Harpo in creative services, Ms. Seitler is where creative meets
business at Oprah Winfrey's production company. She has helped build
Oprah.com and has been involved in some of the show's biggest
brand-placement efforts, including a giveaway of 276 fully loaded
Pontiac G6s in 2005. Along with Ellen Rakieten, Ms. Seitler, an 11-year
vet of Harpo Productions, is taking charge of Harpo's latest
initiative, the launch of a development group to aggressively pursue TV
shows and other programming beyond "Oprah," which just entered its 21st
syndicated season.

Credentials: Ms. Seitler served as VP-marketing and creative
services at ESPN for two years before joining Harpo. Earlier in her
career, she worked for 12 years at MTV, eventually climbing the ranks
to senior VP-marketing and promotions.

Describe how you work with brands. "We are not primarily in the
sales business. When we go out to work with sponsors, it's to
accomplish a creative end. We aren't just inviting all pitches. We have
built a number of really good relationships, and many of them were
built online first. Where there are opportunities and a brand wants to
do something exceptional, and we've already built a great relationship
with [the brand], we might bring [it] into the show for this wonderful
experience. Those are the people we work most closely with because
those are the relationships we have."

How big is your sales staff? "We have four sales people for Oprah.com and a small sales support team."

That's a pretty small staff. How does that work? "The sales
people in place are well-rounded enough and can think creatively enough
in terms of the bigger opportunities. We hope to be small and smart and
have an impactful voice. The partner opportunities that have bubbled up
within the 'Oprah' show environment are fairly unique and pretty
special. We feel like the partners we work with are really special
people because they go with the flow and help us make our show better."

How do you want to be approached? "I think we have good
relationships with many of the brands that are out there that share our
values, and I think we would want to be approached on a values basis.
It's a question of shared philosophy and shared values and shared
creative vision."

What are some of the brand integrations you are most proud of?
"The high-school essay contest around the novel "Night," by Eli Wiesel,
sponsored by AT&T. We were going to go way above and beyond the
show budget by doing a field shoot at Auschwitz with Wiesel and flying
all 50 contest winners to the show to participate and give them a
scholarship. Each winner received a $10,000 scholarship, with $5,000
coming from AT&T and Oprah matching with $5,000. AT&T was very
generous in helping to support the program, and it was an elegant
execution. ... The feedback from [the marketer] is that among many of
their 26,000 employees, this was the most proud moment they had working
at AT&T."

Explain how Harpo works with brands across its multiple platforms, from the magazine to online to the show.
"We tend to work in an organic way with people. There are advertisers
and brands who value what Oprah is about. They will pursue
participating with the Oprah brand in lots of the different platforms.
Sooner or later, those roads come together where one enhances the
other. There aren't a series of templates. We approach each
relationship personally."

What are some of the challenges of working with marketers that want to be embedded into entertainment content?
"We're really straightforward about it, and the lucky thing for us is
that we are not primarily in the sales business. We are very much about
finding the right kind of fit with brands who share our vision and our
voice and are willing to take the leap of faith. The biggest challenge
is to find partners who trust themselves and trust us well enough to
close their eyes and jump. We don't tend to look at opportunities from
a media value point of view."

Is it hard for some brands to measure the impact of integration deals on the show? "We say our measure comes from intangibles. It is hard to quantify and to measure the value of what we do."

What are some of the best brand-integration deals you've worked on for the 'Oprah' show?
"We love our relationship with Dove and with Target. Target has done
everything from being an annual sponsor to working with us as partners
on the Oscars to helping us provide goods for our homes we built in
Houston. We work with them on many levels and we love working with
them. And with Dove, Oprah is very aligned with what they are doing. We
had the Dove girls on a few times, and we will do more with the new
campaign that is coming out."

Where do the integration ideas come from? "Almost 100% of the
ideas come from us. It's not to say we are not influenced by ideas. But
we are in the business of doing 'The Oprah Winfrey Show.' When there is
a need to go out in the marketplace and to have someone enhance the
show, we will. That's not to say we aren't open to ideas. It's just not
what our creative process is."

How has brand integration on the show changed since you came on board in 1995?
"I think we have a bigger view of it, doing it more carefully and with
greater creative scope and elegance rather than doing it on a
producer-by-producer one-off plug basis. Today there are fewer deals
but bigger partnerships that have more of an impact."

How do you think it will evolve over the next 10 years or so? "I
think that our hope is to have reached a level of finesse and
effectiveness and elegance so that it continues to have a premium value
and a premium impact. Our intention is not to grow this thing in terms
of volume but to continue to be able to partner with people in exciting
and elegant ways so they therefore work for our partners. To the degree
that multiple platforms continue to have an impact on media and
consumers, we have to have a presence in many different kinds of
platforms, and hopefully we will be able to create value for our
partners in many different kinds of platforms. We are primarily a TV
company, but the world is not just a television world."

Who has the final word on what makes it onto the show? "It's is
absolutely the senior creative team of the show -- and I work very
closely with the executive producers of the show, and ultimately it's
Oprah. Nothing of that scope is going to happen on the 'Oprah' show
unless she is comfortable."

How do you price the value of integration deals? "We have a
sense of what the marketplace is for being included in TV shows. We
think being included in any way on the 'Oprah' show has extraordinary
value. A lot of times we look at what are the needs of the show and
what are the premium values we can provide for an integration presence
for a product. We are not really in it as a profit center; we are in it
to fulfill a creative goal."

How do you define branded entertainment? "We do entertainment
and to the degree we can make it better and bigger by having a brand
participate, that's what's in it for us. It's entertainment first."

What's on your TiVo? "I watch the 'Oprah' show every night. I
love Jon Stewart, 'Grey's Anatomy,' and my daughter loves 'Project
Runway,' which we watch together all the time."

What's on your iPod? "Heavy jazz."

What do you do in your downtime? "I hang with family, my two children and husband."

ON:Meeting Oprah’s Product-Placement Gatekeeper via @jpenabickley

December 7, 2006No Comments

ON:Meeting Oprah’s Product-Placement Gatekeeper

Harriet Seitler Is Where Creative Meets Business at Harpo Productions

Picture_1_16
Why you need to know her
: A brand doesn't get on "The Oprah
Winfrey Show" unless it gets by Ms. Seitler first. Having started at
Harpo in creative services, Ms. Seitler is where creative meets
business at Oprah Winfrey's production company. She has helped build
Oprah.com and has been involved in some of the show's biggest
brand-placement efforts, including a giveaway of 276 fully loaded
Pontiac G6s in 2005. Along with Ellen Rakieten, Ms. Seitler, an 11-year
vet of Harpo Productions, is taking charge of Harpo's latest
initiative, the launch of a development group to aggressively pursue TV
shows and other programming beyond "Oprah," which just entered its 21st
syndicated season.

Credentials: Ms. Seitler served as VP-marketing and creative
services at ESPN for two years before joining Harpo. Earlier in her
career, she worked for 12 years at MTV, eventually climbing the ranks
to senior VP-marketing and promotions.

Describe how you work with brands. "We are not primarily in the
sales business. When we go out to work with sponsors, it's to
accomplish a creative end. We aren't just inviting all pitches. We have
built a number of really good relationships, and many of them were
built online first. Where there are opportunities and a brand wants to
do something exceptional, and we've already built a great relationship
with [the brand], we might bring [it] into the show for this wonderful
experience. Those are the people we work most closely with because
those are the relationships we have."

How big is your sales staff? "We have four sales people for Oprah.com and a small sales support team."

That's a pretty small staff. How does that work? "The sales
people in place are well-rounded enough and can think creatively enough
in terms of the bigger opportunities. We hope to be small and smart and
have an impactful voice. The partner opportunities that have bubbled up
within the 'Oprah' show environment are fairly unique and pretty
special. We feel like the partners we work with are really special
people because they go with the flow and help us make our show better."

How do you want to be approached? "I think we have good
relationships with many of the brands that are out there that share our
values, and I think we would want to be approached on a values basis.
It's a question of shared philosophy and shared values and shared
creative vision."

What are some of the brand integrations you are most proud of?
"The high-school essay contest around the novel "Night," by Eli Wiesel,
sponsored by AT&T. We were going to go way above and beyond the
show budget by doing a field shoot at Auschwitz with Wiesel and flying
all 50 contest winners to the show to participate and give them a
scholarship. Each winner received a $10,000 scholarship, with $5,000
coming from AT&T and Oprah matching with $5,000. AT&T was very
generous in helping to support the program, and it was an elegant
execution. ... The feedback from [the marketer] is that among many of
their 26,000 employees, this was the most proud moment they had working
at AT&T."

Explain how Harpo works with brands across its multiple platforms, from the magazine to online to the show.
"We tend to work in an organic way with people. There are advertisers
and brands who value what Oprah is about. They will pursue
participating with the Oprah brand in lots of the different platforms.
Sooner or later, those roads come together where one enhances the
other. There aren't a series of templates. We approach each
relationship personally."

What are some of the challenges of working with marketers that want to be embedded into entertainment content?
"We're really straightforward about it, and the lucky thing for us is
that we are not primarily in the sales business. We are very much about
finding the right kind of fit with brands who share our vision and our
voice and are willing to take the leap of faith. The biggest challenge
is to find partners who trust themselves and trust us well enough to
close their eyes and jump. We don't tend to look at opportunities from
a media value point of view."

Is it hard for some brands to measure the impact of integration deals on the show? "We say our measure comes from intangibles. It is hard to quantify and to measure the value of what we do."

What are some of the best brand-integration deals you've worked on for the 'Oprah' show?
"We love our relationship with Dove and with Target. Target has done
everything from being an annual sponsor to working with us as partners
on the Oscars to helping us provide goods for our homes we built in
Houston. We work with them on many levels and we love working with
them. And with Dove, Oprah is very aligned with what they are doing. We
had the Dove girls on a few times, and we will do more with the new
campaign that is coming out."

Where do the integration ideas come from? "Almost 100% of the
ideas come from us. It's not to say we are not influenced by ideas. But
we are in the business of doing 'The Oprah Winfrey Show.' When there is
a need to go out in the marketplace and to have someone enhance the
show, we will. That's not to say we aren't open to ideas. It's just not
what our creative process is."

How has brand integration on the show changed since you came on board in 1995?
"I think we have a bigger view of it, doing it more carefully and with
greater creative scope and elegance rather than doing it on a
producer-by-producer one-off plug basis. Today there are fewer deals
but bigger partnerships that have more of an impact."

How do you think it will evolve over the next 10 years or so? "I
think that our hope is to have reached a level of finesse and
effectiveness and elegance so that it continues to have a premium value
and a premium impact. Our intention is not to grow this thing in terms
of volume but to continue to be able to partner with people in exciting
and elegant ways so they therefore work for our partners. To the degree
that multiple platforms continue to have an impact on media and
consumers, we have to have a presence in many different kinds of
platforms, and hopefully we will be able to create value for our
partners in many different kinds of platforms. We are primarily a TV
company, but the world is not just a television world."

Who has the final word on what makes it onto the show? "It's is
absolutely the senior creative team of the show -- and I work very
closely with the executive producers of the show, and ultimately it's
Oprah. Nothing of that scope is going to happen on the 'Oprah' show
unless she is comfortable."

How do you price the value of integration deals? "We have a
sense of what the marketplace is for being included in TV shows. We
think being included in any way on the 'Oprah' show has extraordinary
value. A lot of times we look at what are the needs of the show and
what are the premium values we can provide for an integration presence
for a product. We are not really in it as a profit center; we are in it
to fulfill a creative goal."

How do you define branded entertainment? "We do entertainment
and to the degree we can make it better and bigger by having a brand
participate, that's what's in it for us. It's entertainment first."

What's on your TiVo? "I watch the 'Oprah' show every night. I
love Jon Stewart, 'Grey's Anatomy,' and my daughter loves 'Project
Runway,' which we watch together all the time."

What's on your iPod? "Heavy jazz."

What do you do in your downtime? "I hang with family, my two children and husband."

ON:Meeting Oprah’s Product-Placement Gatekeeper via @jpenabickley

November 30, 20062 Comments

ON: Clever Advertising

Denverwater01_1
Denver-based Sukle Advertising + Design
created a great advertising campaign for water conservation in Denver.

They illustrate their tagline “Use Only What You Need.” very cleverly by
using only a portion of the advertising space. A great example is the
billboard which has been exposed except for the area that contains the
actual message.

See the shots of the creative below.
Denverwater02

Denverwater03_1

Denverwater04

They also did a number of 30 Sec. spots.

ON: Clever Advertising via @jpenabickley

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Joanna routinely to speaks and keynotes at conferences, corporations, non-profits, educational and professional organizations. Her subject matter expertise is customized to meet the needs of each audience. 

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TALK: Making Magic with Ai

Ai is the tool of the modern magician. At the nascent stages of the another industrial and social revolution, magic + math, multiplied by design makes what is invariable hard — seem remarkably easy.

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