August 14, 2007No Comments

ON: Emerging Media + Media Long Tail = Buying Confusion

As advertisers move more of their budgets to emerging media, they need to ensure that they don’t end up putting the brand on the back seat.  Emerging or new media is now referred to as being at the end of a Media Long Tail. This concept describes how niche media, such as the uber choices of online and mobile content and communities, when combined, have more impact than mass media like TV.

In the last few weeks I have heard the following questions:

  1. What mix of activities will work best for my brand?
  2. How much do I invest in what emerging media? 

I start by saying the following things:

  1. Lets look at your budget and combine that with meeting your brand objectives.
  2. Web is not New Media. It is now more affective with the ever-consuming audience who lives it.
  3. Invest in TV for what it does best...Drive mass awareness. (unless you are on to infrequently) If you have a small budget you need to use TV for high impact awareness and drive to an experience that people will remember and talk about.
  4. Invest in Web for what it does best, which is mass awareness + brand participation which = affinity (people choose you because they love what you have given them)

When we are creating ideas (big and small) we should be looking for ways that media can amplify our core message and then how do we use that media so that consumers interact with our brands in a relevant way. In order to get there you need the following:

  1. The brand idea must always come first.
    The role of media is to advance the brand agenda. This means the contributions from individual media must flow together with complete clarity, so that at the moment of purchase decision, people have strong brand memories to call upon, clear associations and a sense of brand leadership. Think not what you should do with video, but what videos should do for you!
  2. Be media neutral and embrace a cross-media world.
    We have got away with working in silos in terms of audience and effectiveness measurement for far too long. Advertisers need a common currency to understand the effect of the various media, used individually or in combination. And creative ideas must now be developed to serve as the platform for multi-channel communications: from TV to in-store, outdoor to search keywords.
  3. Don’t forget scale.
    Reach is important.  The reach of TV, newspapers and outdoor are still at the center of advertising campaigns. The drive for engagement and the lure of the shiny object (SOS = Shiny Object Syndrome) have distracted advertisers from the necessity of delivering effective communications to a wide audience. Adopting a 'scalable engagement' approach requires mixing 'top down' interruptive advertising with 'bottom up' communications that start from an engagement and brand interaction or participation to deliver an integrated consumer engagement plan.

Looking at the big picture is important.  It will help you create a consumer experience that uses each of the media channels to their strengths and when not working in silos will allow us to create fluid conversation for the people we hope to convert at in store and online.

ON: Emerging Media + Media Long Tail = Buying Confusion via @jpenabickley

August 14, 2007No Comments

ON: Emerging Media + Media Long Tail = Buying Confusion

As advertisers move more of their budgets to emerging media, they need to ensure that they don’t end up putting the brand on the back seat.  Emerging or new media is now referred to as being at the end of a Media Long Tail. This concept describes how niche media, such as the uber choices of online and mobile content and communities, when combined, have more impact than mass media like TV.

In the last few weeks I have heard the following questions:

  1. What mix of activities will work best for my brand?
  2. How much do I invest in what emerging media? 

I start by saying the following things:

  1. Lets look at your budget and combine that with meeting your brand objectives.
  2. Web is not New Media. It is now more affective with the ever-consuming audience who lives it.
  3. Invest in TV for what it does best...Drive mass awareness. (unless you are on to infrequently) If you have a small budget you need to use TV for high impact awareness and drive to an experience that people will remember and talk about.
  4. Invest in Web for what it does best, which is mass awareness + brand participation which = affinity (people choose you because they love what you have given them)

When we are creating ideas (big and small) we should be looking for ways that media can amplify our core message and then how do we use that media so that consumers interact with our brands in a relevant way. In order to get there you need the following:

  1. The brand idea must always come first.
    The role of media is to advance the brand agenda. This means the contributions from individual media must flow together with complete clarity, so that at the moment of purchase decision, people have strong brand memories to call upon, clear associations and a sense of brand leadership. Think not what you should do with video, but what videos should do for you!
  2. Be media neutral and embrace a cross-media world.
    We have got away with working in silos in terms of audience and effectiveness measurement for far too long. Advertisers need a common currency to understand the effect of the various media, used individually or in combination. And creative ideas must now be developed to serve as the platform for multi-channel communications: from TV to in-store, outdoor to search keywords.
  3. Don’t forget scale.
    Reach is important.  The reach of TV, newspapers and outdoor are still at the center of advertising campaigns. The drive for engagement and the lure of the shiny object (SOS = Shiny Object Syndrome) have distracted advertisers from the necessity of delivering effective communications to a wide audience. Adopting a 'scalable engagement' approach requires mixing 'top down' interruptive advertising with 'bottom up' communications that start from an engagement and brand interaction or participation to deliver an integrated consumer engagement plan.

Looking at the big picture is important.  It will help you create a consumer experience that uses each of the media channels to their strengths and when not working in silos will allow us to create fluid conversation for the people we hope to convert at in store and online.

ON: Emerging Media + Media Long Tail = Buying Confusion via @jpenabickley

August 14, 2007No Comments

ON: Emerging Media + Media Long Tail = Buying Confusion

As advertisers move more of their budgets to emerging media, they need to ensure that they don’t end up putting the brand on the back seat.  Emerging or new media is now referred to as being at the end of a Media Long Tail. This concept describes how niche media, such as the uber choices of online and mobile content and communities, when combined, have more impact than mass media like TV.

In the last few weeks I have heard the following questions:

  1. What mix of activities will work best for my brand?
  2. How much do I invest in what emerging media? 

I start by saying the following things:

  1. Lets look at your budget and combine that with meeting your brand objectives.
  2. Web is not New Media. It is now more affective with the ever-consuming audience who lives it.
  3. Invest in TV for what it does best...Drive mass awareness. (unless you are on to infrequently) If you have a small budget you need to use TV for high impact awareness and drive to an experience that people will remember and talk about.
  4. Invest in Web for what it does best, which is mass awareness + brand participation which = affinity (people choose you because they love what you have given them)

When we are creating ideas (big and small) we should be looking for ways that media can amplify our core message and then how do we use that media so that consumers interact with our brands in a relevant way. In order to get there you need the following:

  1. The brand idea must always come first.
    The role of media is to advance the brand agenda. This means the contributions from individual media must flow together with complete clarity, so that at the moment of purchase decision, people have strong brand memories to call upon, clear associations and a sense of brand leadership. Think not what you should do with video, but what videos should do for you!
  2. Be media neutral and embrace a cross-media world.
    We have got away with working in silos in terms of audience and effectiveness measurement for far too long. Advertisers need a common currency to understand the effect of the various media, used individually or in combination. And creative ideas must now be developed to serve as the platform for multi-channel communications: from TV to in-store, outdoor to search keywords.
  3. Don’t forget scale.
    Reach is important.  The reach of TV, newspapers and outdoor are still at the center of advertising campaigns. The drive for engagement and the lure of the shiny object (SOS = Shiny Object Syndrome) have distracted advertisers from the necessity of delivering effective communications to a wide audience. Adopting a 'scalable engagement' approach requires mixing 'top down' interruptive advertising with 'bottom up' communications that start from an engagement and brand interaction or participation to deliver an integrated consumer engagement plan.

Looking at the big picture is important.  It will help you create a consumer experience that uses each of the media channels to their strengths and when not working in silos will allow us to create fluid conversation for the people we hope to convert at in store and online.

ON: Emerging Media + Media Long Tail = Buying Confusion via @jpenabickley

May 30, 2007No Comments

ON:Muvi & The New Beetle

Picture_3

This is a smooth site.  LG introduces Muvi

Beyond the sleek product design the visuals on this site were exciting and motivated me to think about trading up my Aquarius blue Beetle for a new one that had a Muvi with a color match.

Picture_4

The Muvi product photography combined with the illustrative nature of the the 3D graphics gave this a superb feel and exciting presentation layer.  (actually made it worth sitting through a site intro)

Picture_5

While I am never crazy about the "book" metaphor as an interface this was fun as the fashion had enough non traditional animation and the pages had video that made each page unique. 

View the site @ http://www.coolnstyle.com/promotion/nb/index.html

ON:Muvi & The New Beetle via @jpenabickley

May 30, 2007No Comments

ON:Muvi & The New Beetle

Picture_3

This is a smooth site.  LG introduces Muvi

Beyond the sleek product design the visuals on this site were exciting and motivated me to think about trading up my Aquarius blue Beetle for a new one that had a Muvi with a color match.

Picture_4

The Muvi product photography combined with the illustrative nature of the the 3D graphics gave this a superb feel and exciting presentation layer.  (actually made it worth sitting through a site intro)

Picture_5

While I am never crazy about the "book" metaphor as an interface this was fun as the fashion had enough non traditional animation and the pages had video that made each page unique. 

View the site @ http://www.coolnstyle.com/promotion/nb/index.html

ON:Muvi & The New Beetle via @jpenabickley

May 10, 20072 Comments

ON: Spider-Man 3

Picture_2

As I am a big comic book fan I thought i would check out one of my favorite comic book properties Spider-Man 3.  Over all the experience was rich...This website has everything the internet has to offer: games,
downloads of wallpaper, widgets, screensavers, a mobile section, blogs
and video offered in a choice of full-screen, Quicktime and high
definition. It also offers some exclusive, web-only content to entice
users, like behind-the-scenes footage and interviews with the stunt
team.

The only thing that let me down about the site was the conspicuous
absence of user-generated content. For example, the blog section, which
I expected to be a forum for users, was actually just a series of video
blogs produced by the franchise itself. After exploring for a while, I
finally found a forum where users can post their thoughts; oddly
enough, it was a bit of an online ghost town. Many users had responded
to the video blogs in admiration of the film, but that's mere
"Spider-Man 2" technology. After searching, I finally managed to find a
place to submit user-generated webisodes.

Check it out at: http://flash.sonypictures.com/movies/spiderman3/site/index.php

ON: Spider-Man 3 via @jpenabickley

March 25, 2007No Comments

ON:The Breach

Picture_17

Unless you're hiding under a rock, you've heard something about the
movie "The Breach." It seems to be everywhere, and everyone is
discussing it. I haven't seen the movie yet, but was so glad to see
that with the importance of interactive in today's media mix, the time
was spent for more than just a run-of-the-mill movie website.

Picture_15

There is solid video streaming, with a nice layout and quick
responses; a good selection to choose from and more than just the
regular photo gallery and cast and crew-for example, there's a fake FBI
exam
and an "Uncover the Mole" game. Some real time and effort was put
in, and I think it paid off. I felt engaged from the time I landed on
the site and wasn't let down as I moved through the rich content and
interesting features.

Check it out at http://breachmovie.net/

ON:The Breach via @jpenabickley

March 25, 20076 Comments

ON: The Agency Of The Future

The Agency of the future is built around its clients needs, not its former out-dated specialty. 

We are all marketers no matter the discipline, creatives are strategic, account directors are relationship experts and business drivers, producers are technologists that are movers and shakers, and technologists are creators.

Having grown up in digital agencies, I have had first hand experience that creativity crossed all disciplines.  Creative Directors have equal footing in art, copy and architecture.  The digital world is analytical by nature.   Our culture begins with comprehension of the technologies we are designing and dialogging through.

In the digital world we tear things apart and put them back together (the birth of the mash-up). It's how we learn, it is how we have evolved it is how we will continue to dominate the marketing world.

In the past, traditional agencies created great creative in "pairs", a copywriter and an art director. This worked for mediums that did NOT have constantly moving parts, interaction counts, daily technology advances and emerging engagement models.

In the digital world, the creation process is more complex. Strategists, designers, copy writers, information architects, media specialists, and technologists must come together to create great experiences.

A great experience is not only captured in a well-developed site, but in the distribution of seeded content that delivers brand impressions that lead to product and brand loyalty.

In a recent conversation with a group of traditional marketers whose “above the line” creative directors refused to view digital creative as “creative”, I quickly drew the parallel that started as the demise of the big agency in the mid nineties.  Clients are constantly looking for the Big Idea…. But the Big Idea does not always manifest itself in a commercial.  As a matter of fact I would beg to differ that the brand essence was ever captured in a television spot.

Now that we live in the world of mediums that have converged, traditional creative are losing work to digital creative.  Traditional commercials have lost their steam because they often do not contain the context of the web.  The traditional budgets for the 15-second spot cannot compete with the budget it takes to create a 15 second interactive pre-roll unit that delivers engagement data and micro site capabilities. 

Nor can the 15-second spot on TV offer anything more than a GRP as data on its audience. 

For my digital posse, here is how the broadcast world works...

Sum of all rating points over a specific time period or over the course of a media plan; sometimes called homes per rating point. The rating of a show represents the percentage of people (or households) tuned in to a television program as compared to the number of television sets in the particular television universe (geographical location). Each rating point is equal to 1%. If a show has a rating of 7, that means that 7% of all persons (or households) who have a television were tuned in to that show (whether the other televisions were turned on or not). If there are two shows on a particular station during a particular time period, and the first show has a rating of 7 and the other a rating of 10, then the GRPs for that time period equal 17.

Media planners use gross rating points as a method of designing a media schedule in an attempt to deliver a maximum number of GRPs at minimum cost. In this instance, GRPs are calculated by multiplying the total reach (the unduplicated audience) of the schedule by the frequency (average amount of exposures) of the insertion in the proposed schedule. The gross rating points then will represent the product of reach and frequency and will express the "gross" duplicated percentage of audience that will be reached by the proposed plan. (It is important to note that GRPs are a percentage. )

Therefore, if a given market has 1000 television households, each GRP represents 10 viewing households, whereas in a market of 10,000 television households, each GRP represents 100 viewing households. Thus, the largest amount of GRPs does not necessarily mean the largest audience.)

The difference between TV and digital is that TV can drive awareness and eventually prove lift through sales.  If done with the right consumer engagement map, Digital drives brand experience, community, brand immersion, brand loyalty, trial and in store sales.  TV has yet to deliver community unless the content was engaging.

Examples of TV content that creates community has been content like the Sopranos, Sex and the City, The L Word or 24.  But what all of this mass market content has in common is that they have rampant online communities that ad fuel to the storylines, create word of mouth behavior and deliver in-depth engagement.

The traditional TV spot has yet to deliver that. 

I recently participated in an in-depth explanation of how to define engagement.  How do you interpret the numbers?  It is all about the context.  Before you begin the engagement, create your marketing objectives and align them with the creative objectives.  Ensure that it is strategic and drives sales.  Is it enough for people to know you (awareness).  For me it is more important that people choose you (demand & purchase).

In a world where consumers own the brand inclusive of the creative process, marketers (agency clients) are forcing the “above the line agencies” to put the big production budgets and flashy ads aside for low cost alternatives which fit into ROI models where exact measurement is found.   

Thus the reality of engagement!

So while our traditional counterparts are “figuring it out” the large agency is quickly loosing out on its creative je nois se quoi. Smaller, nimble digital agencies who have been used to delivering big bang, reality based metrics and BIG Ideas for less and for years are now winning the race for marketing production and media dollars.

Related Posts:

ON: The Agency Of The Future via @jpenabickley

March 8, 20076 Comments

ON:How To Kill Your Brand

This video has received over 450,000 views and over 2,500 comments.  The key to the building loyal consumers is honesty.  Read more at Campfire.

ON:How To Kill Your Brand via @jpenabickley

February 9, 20075 Comments

ON: Bud.TV

Picture_4_6

Fresh off their USA Today Super Bowl advertising poll victory, Budweiser has flipped the switch on Bud.tv.  This might turn out to be one of the biggest stories
in advertising this year. Anheuser-Busch will spend over $30 million
this year on this online video network.

The site would be on my top 10 in the usability category if the age verification actually worked.

Picture_3_16

Once you call the toll free number and get an access code because the flawed age verification system in place did not let you in despite being in your mid-30's...the site uses video in an exciting way.

The site is easy to use and features short films like “Finish Our Film”.
This mash-up of reality show and making-of-a-film documentary produced
by LivePlanet, Matt Damon and Ben Affleck’s production company.  Not
surprisingly most of the videos lean towards 25-year guy humor with
high art concepts like “Replaced by a Chimp” in which a chimp tries to
do a real job.

This is a new play on one of the oldest tactics in marketing known
as branded entertainment. P&G started it in the age of radio with
the soap opera. There have been
many attempts by marketers to create content online that provides a
contextual envelope to advertise their brands some have done a great job (The Rookie & 24) some have failed miserably.  Success is always found in the story that they brand tells.  A-B's Bud.tv is the
most ambitious.

A-B intends to tread carefully in how they promote their brands.
They are acutely aware of how easy it would be turn off their audience
with excessively blatant promotion. You’ll know it’s for Bud brands but
it will be subtle s, so they say. 

As many of you know, I am a huge advocate of branded entertainment and relevant content.  But then I factor in the ROI or the impressions model as a layer to be considered.

  • $30 million is about 5% of A-B’s ad budget. 
  • Their goal
    is to reach 2-3 million 21-34 year-old guys per month.
  • Lets give an educated guess as to streams -24-36
    million exposures per year
  • That works out an average of $1 to get
    each customer to spend time with them.

Compared to a 30 sec spot
on the Super bowl that’s expensive. But is it really? 
How might we begin to measure the engagemnt model for this form of advertising?  It would be nice to see an equation that factors in an average of 16 minutes of engagement for each consumer who will spend
lots of time on Bud.tv, giving A-B the opportunity to put lots of ad
exposures in front their customers.

What are your thoughts?

ON: Bud.TV via @jpenabickley
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