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July 13, 20082 Comments

ON: Kawasaki’s Language of Motorsport Love

Dynamic Flash, Actionscript 3.0, Limelight Streaming video Technologies, Ajax, XML Data Feeds make up the sweet sensation that is one of the most rewarding product sites I have seen in a long time.  The Kawasaki Teryx RUV vehicle site is so stellar that it represents both an awareness and conversion site.

Picture_1

The artful influence of the experence designers at Fuse Interactive have launched the New Teryx RUV vehicle site to a wide ranging demographic - community in the motor sports world with a year long feature rich site.  Check out the Terrain section with Hank Williams 3, yes that's right.. Grandson of the late Hank
Williams,  country music legend.

After trading a few emails with CEO and Exec. Creative Director of Fuse Interactive, Stefan Drust  writes "Another nice feature is we worked with SpeedTV on a 13 week 22 minute short movie about the Teryx and it's capabilities, we then were able to leverage the content from the TV into our site. So overall the goal of reaching into the hearts of the consumer at the riding level only helps us better understand the consumer and truly provide potential Kawasaki customers 360 degree experiential marketing.We have linked our online marketing efforts with the TV as well as with the In-store POP."

The site's tone and design reaches out and holds the heart of the heart land of America which is the community which are the core evangelists of this category. The site is rich with content that is relevant to the brand as well as the lifestyle of its core consumer target.  The question I have is why have they not enabled the ease of consumer conversation by widgetizing every piece of content for social media.  With  criticism aside this is yet another stellar creation from Fuse Interactive 

ON: Kawasaki’s Language of Motorsport Love via @jpenabickley

December 24, 20072 Comments

ON: Jakob Nielsen’s Dated Viewpoint

Jakob_nielsen
It is rare that I let a post ruin my day or make my blood boil.  However, I got a chance to read Jakob Nielsen's article on his Alertbox called, Web 2.0 Can Be Dangerous and it had me seeing red.  In recent years, I have found most of Nielsen's posts are close-minded and ill informed – yet his write up on Web 2.0 Can Be Dangerous was the worst offender and takes the cake.

The main point of his
article is to prove that:

“AJAX, rich Internet UIs, mashups, communities, and
user-generated content often add more complexity than they're worth. They also
divert design resources and prove (once again) that what's hyped is rarely
what's most profitable.”

Fellow practitioners agree that his POVs are just that - his personal view, take, opinion, etc.  However, as an active practitioner of  AJAX, rich Internet UIs, mashups, communities, and user-generated content programs I can attest that these are not methods and languages are not hyped, they are a basic need in the conversation economy.  Moreover, they have improved the way we think, build, and create experiences for consumers to engage within.  Not only do I disagree that we divert design resources, but I would state that design resources need to jump into the game and treat their work as if it were always in beta. (Like a great car designer or architect)  old school designers need to get into the game.

He makes many arguments, one of which is there are two few users for community and user-generated content.  After examining three different teen studies conducted by major media companies and one from Forrester that show 75% are active contributors in online community content, it is presumable that users are not limiting their online conversations and dialogs to merely interesting business tasks.

The vast majority of his points are off and have no real world practitioner’s basis for the conclusions except one.

“Instead of adding Facebook-like features that let users bite other
users and turn them into zombies, the B2B site would get more sales by offering
clear prices, good product photos, detailed specs, convincing whitepapers, an
easily navigable information architecture... Before throwing spending money at 2.0 features, make sure that you have
all the 1.0 requirements working to perfection.”

We in the digital world should take to heart.  This was a good point but the way it is stated is a bit backwards and stated with the attitude of a dictator (someone who does not seek outside insights to find solutions to a problem) when getting to that conclusion, I have hard time taking the article seriously.

What Nielsen has managed to do with his latest post is prove that Web 1.0 guys who refuse to see the light of new consumer engagement models. Nielson proves the he cannot evolve with the help of insights and has inevitably become the old guy at the bar, trying to pick up women with bad pick-up lines. Simultaneously, AJAX practitioners  are reaping the benefits of listening, changing practices to evolve with their audience (like any good partner should).

One of his arguments takes on profitability, which can be discredited by any number of profitable web companies that have been pushing the envelope of innovation.

Practitioners sound off... Do you think Jakob Nielsen's viewpoint keeps the industry from moving forward?  Alternatively, does it keep us in a method that helped prove the demise of the 1.0 model?

ON: Jakob Nielsen’s Dated Viewpoint via @jpenabickley

December 24, 20072 Comments

ON: Jakob Nielsen’s Dated Viewpoint

Jakob_nielsen
It is rare that I let a post ruin my day or make my blood boil.  However, I got a chance to read Jakob Nielsen's article on his Alertbox called, Web 2.0 Can Be Dangerous and it had me seeing red.  In recent years, I have found most of Nielsen's posts are close-minded and ill informed – yet his write up on Web 2.0 Can Be Dangerous was the worst offender and takes the cake.

The main point of his
article is to prove that:

“AJAX, rich Internet UIs, mashups, communities, and
user-generated content often add more complexity than they're worth. They also
divert design resources and prove (once again) that what's hyped is rarely
what's most profitable.”

Fellow practitioners agree that his POVs are just that - his personal view, take, opinion, etc.  However, as an active practitioner of  AJAX, rich Internet UIs, mashups, communities, and user-generated content programs I can attest that these are not methods and languages are not hyped, they are a basic need in the conversation economy.  Moreover, they have improved the way we think, build, and create experiences for consumers to engage within.  Not only do I disagree that we divert design resources, but I would state that design resources need to jump into the game and treat their work as if it were always in beta. (Like a great car designer or architect)  old school designers need to get into the game.

He makes many arguments, one of which is there are two few users for community and user-generated content.  After examining three different teen studies conducted by major media companies and one from Forrester that show 75% are active contributors in online community content, it is presumable that users are not limiting their online conversations and dialogs to merely interesting business tasks.

The vast majority of his points are off and have no real world practitioner’s basis for the conclusions except one.

“Instead of adding Facebook-like features that let users bite other
users and turn them into zombies, the B2B site would get more sales by offering
clear prices, good product photos, detailed specs, convincing whitepapers, an
easily navigable information architecture... Before throwing spending money at 2.0 features, make sure that you have
all the 1.0 requirements working to perfection.”

We in the digital world should take to heart.  This was a good point but the way it is stated is a bit backwards and stated with the attitude of a dictator (someone who does not seek outside insights to find solutions to a problem) when getting to that conclusion, I have hard time taking the article seriously.

What Nielsen has managed to do with his latest post is prove that Web 1.0 guys who refuse to see the light of new consumer engagement models. Nielson proves the he cannot evolve with the help of insights and has inevitably become the old guy at the bar, trying to pick up women with bad pick-up lines. Simultaneously, AJAX practitioners  are reaping the benefits of listening, changing practices to evolve with their audience (like any good partner should).

One of his arguments takes on profitability, which can be discredited by any number of profitable web companies that have been pushing the envelope of innovation.

Practitioners sound off... Do you think Jakob Nielsen's viewpoint keeps the industry from moving forward?  Alternatively, does it keep us in a method that helped prove the demise of the 1.0 model?

ON: Jakob Nielsen’s Dated Viewpoint via @jpenabickley

December 24, 20072 Comments

ON: Jakob Nielsen’s Dated Viewpoint

Jakob_nielsen
It is rare that I let a post ruin my day or make my blood boil.  However, I got a chance to read Jakob Nielsen's article on his Alertbox called, Web 2.0 Can Be Dangerous and it had me seeing red.  In recent years, I have found most of Nielsen's posts are close-minded and ill informed – yet his write up on Web 2.0 Can Be Dangerous was the worst offender and takes the cake.

The main point of his
article is to prove that:

“AJAX, rich Internet UIs, mashups, communities, and
user-generated content often add more complexity than they're worth. They also
divert design resources and prove (once again) that what's hyped is rarely
what's most profitable.”

Fellow practitioners agree that his POVs are just that - his personal view, take, opinion, etc.  However, as an active practitioner of  AJAX, rich Internet UIs, mashups, communities, and user-generated content programs I can attest that these are not methods and languages are not hyped, they are a basic need in the conversation economy.  Moreover, they have improved the way we think, build, and create experiences for consumers to engage within.  Not only do I disagree that we divert design resources, but I would state that design resources need to jump into the game and treat their work as if it were always in beta. (Like a great car designer or architect)  old school designers need to get into the game.

He makes many arguments, one of which is there are two few users for community and user-generated content.  After examining three different teen studies conducted by major media companies and one from Forrester that show 75% are active contributors in online community content, it is presumable that users are not limiting their online conversations and dialogs to merely interesting business tasks.

The vast majority of his points are off and have no real world practitioner’s basis for the conclusions except one.

“Instead of adding Facebook-like features that let users bite other
users and turn them into zombies, the B2B site would get more sales by offering
clear prices, good product photos, detailed specs, convincing whitepapers, an
easily navigable information architecture... Before throwing spending money at 2.0 features, make sure that you have
all the 1.0 requirements working to perfection.”

We in the digital world should take to heart.  This was a good point but the way it is stated is a bit backwards and stated with the attitude of a dictator (someone who does not seek outside insights to find solutions to a problem) when getting to that conclusion, I have hard time taking the article seriously.

What Nielsen has managed to do with his latest post is prove that Web 1.0 guys who refuse to see the light of new consumer engagement models. Nielson proves the he cannot evolve with the help of insights and has inevitably become the old guy at the bar, trying to pick up women with bad pick-up lines. Simultaneously, AJAX practitioners  are reaping the benefits of listening, changing practices to evolve with their audience (like any good partner should).

One of his arguments takes on profitability, which can be discredited by any number of profitable web companies that have been pushing the envelope of innovation.

Practitioners sound off... Do you think Jakob Nielsen's viewpoint keeps the industry from moving forward?  Alternatively, does it keep us in a method that helped prove the demise of the 1.0 model?

ON: Jakob Nielsen’s Dated Viewpoint via @jpenabickley

September 7, 200715 Comments

ON: Web Designing Today – Not Yesterday

I am one of those people who believes that web design is very much like designing a car.  In order to create something great you must understand how it works.  Over the past few years I have been working on a number of projects that look at brand, web applications and the implications of technology on brand. This new generation of explorations looks at Ajax, Flash, Apollo and a number of presentation layer languages that facilitate the best consumer experiences.  Here are some great excerpts from Head Rush Ajax by Brett McLaughlin what this does is gives marketers and old school HTMLers the 411 on asynchronous JavaScript and XML.

Put a new shine on your web applications.
Tired of
clunky web interfaces and waiting around for a page to reload? Well, it’s
about time to give your web apps that pine-scented desktop application
feel. What are we talking about? Just the newest thing to hit the Web:
Ajax—asynchronous JavaScript and XML—and your ticket to building
rich Internet applications that are more interactive, responsive, and easy
to use.

So, grab your trial-size Ajax, included with every copy of Head
Rush Ajax: we’re about to put some polish on your web apps.

Are your customers tired of waiting around when they place an order on your
site? Are you getting complaints that every time a button is pushed, the page
reloads? Then it’s time to get with the program, and take your programming to
the next level. Welcome to the next generation of web apps, where JavaScript,
some dynamic HTML, and a little bit of XML can make your applications feel
like dynamic, responsive desktop apps.

Let’s take a look at the kind of applications you (and your customers) are used to:

Welcome to the new millenium!

Anybody can program using the same old request/response
model. But if you want faster apps that feel like you’re
working on a desktop, you need something new—you need
Ajax, a completely different approach to web programming:

Web Design with Ajax

“Reloads? We don’t need no stinking reloads.”

There’s nothing more annoying than an application that redraws the whole
page everytime you push a button or type in a value. In Katie’s report, only a
few numbers are changing, but the entire page has to be redrawn.

First, let's figure out why all that reloading is going on......

Ajax to the rescue

Do you see what the problem is? Every time Katie wants to find out the
latest number of boards sold, the entire screen is redrawn, and she’s left
with the Internet version of snow blindness.

Use Ajax to fix the web report...

Let’s change Katie’s report to use Ajax to send the request
for updated board sales. Then we can get the response from
the server, and update the web page using JavaScript and
dynamic HTML. No more page reloading, and Katie will be
a happy snowboarder again.

Read more at: http://www.webreference.com/programming/hra/3.html

ON: Web Designing Today – Not Yesterday via @jpenabickley

March 22, 20071 Comment

ON: Visits’ The New Measure of Web-User Engagement

comScore is adding a new metric, "visits" - which the measurement
firm defines as the number of distinct times people visit a site per
day, with at least 30 minutes between each visit - which could
potentially replace the pageview as a key advertiser metric, reports ClickZ (via MarketingVox).

Whereas pageviews generate a raw number of
how many pages on the site were hit in a given period, visits point to
a user's engagement with the site. Tracking visits, comScore says, will
give a picture of how many times the same person comes back, indicating
the level of loyalty toward the site.

Another driving force behind a new metric is that non-HTML
web-authoring technologies such as Flash and AJAX do not create pages
per se; therefore, pageviews don't, as a practical matter, exist and so
aren't recorded - even though a user may be interacting with the site.
Developers use these technologies because they build slicker and more
user-friendly sites.

One problem for advertisers is that visits, unlike pageviews, don't
correspond to ad impressions. But coupling visits with a site's reach
and the length of each stay offers a fuller picture of the site's
audience.

ON: Visits’ The New Measure of Web-User Engagement via @jpenabickley

December 19, 2006No Comments

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo

Picture_8
The debate over which site had the most November page views reflects
the difficulty of tallying Web traffic, and billions of ad dollars are
at stake.  On the Web, the competition for most popular site can be as intense as
the race for the pennant or even the Presidency. So news that
up-and-comer MySpace.com beat incumbent Yahoo! (YHOO) for most monthly page views for the first time in November understandably grabbed headlines.

According to comScore Networks, News Corp.'s (NWS)
MySpace racked up 38.7 billion page views in November, compared with
38.1 billion for longtime leader Yahoo. But the dispatches concerning
the upset were the online equivalent of the famous headline "Dewey
Beats Truman."

Almost immediately, the results were called into question. UBS (UBS)
analyst Benjamin Schachter left voicemail messages for investors and
reporters warning against making decisions on comScore's potentially
unreliable data. Yahoo was still the undisputed leader, measured by
other key metrics, including unique visitors and time spent on the
site. Besides, Nielsen//NetRatings (NTRT),
comScore's main competitor, still had Yahoo leading page views in
November: 33.4 billion, vs. 29 billion for MySpace and the rest of News
Corp.'s Fox Interactive Media properties.

Focusing on Ad Impressions

Picture_9
The discrepancy has revived complaints about the accuracy of
reporting agencies' results, which often differ from companies' own
audience measurements (see BusinessWeek.com, 10/23/06, "Web Numbers: What's Real").
It also underscores the rivalry between comScore and
Nielsen//NetRatings for recognition as the most trusted source for
Web-traffic data. The winner, if one emerges, may set the standard for
how site popularity is measured, influencing how marketers dole out
billions in online ad dollars each year. Recognizing the high stakes in
that tussle, comScore and Nielsen//NetRatings both are refining their
tactics.

For starters, in the first quarter of 2007, comScore plans to change
how it determines the amount of advertising a Web company shows its
audience. To do that, comScore will focus on ad impressions, or the
number of times an ad shows up on a page, rather than the number of
times a Web page is viewed. The results can vary, depending on how a
Web page is designed.

For example, Yahoo and Google (GOOG)
are among companies that use a technology called Ajax that can change
an ad, influencing the number of ad impressions, even if the user
doesn't refresh or click to a different page. Yahoo attributed the 9%
drop in its page views, which allowed MySpace to overtake it, to its
inclusion of Ajax. Thus, page views—long used by industry analysts to
estimate how many ads a company can serve and, thus, potential
revenue—is no longer a reliable measurement.

Time Spent on a Site

ComScore is also planning to launch a set of entirely new ad metrics
in the second quarter of 2007, according to comScore Chief Executive
Officer Magid Abraham. "We are developing some proprietary metrics that
are a much better replacement for page views and are actually a better
measure of engagement," says Abraham.

Abraham is tight-lipped about specifics, but he says the new
techniques will better reflect the influence of new technologies. The
company will focus more on time spent on a site than page views. It's
worth noting that, by that estimate, Yahoo is the clear winner. Its
users spent 42.7 billion minutes on its pages in November. MySpace's
users spent a total of 13.8 billion minutes, says Abraham. 

Nielsen//NetRatings is also working on its measurement techniques in
response to new technologies. The firm developed a proposal several
months ago on how to track Ajax and improve tracking on other
technologies such as streaming media, says Manish Bhatia, NetRatings'
vice-president of global operations and U.S. sales.

Getting Certified

Changing the metrics alone, however, isn't enough to satisfy
everyone. The Interactive Advertising Bureau, an organization of
advertisers and major Web companies, is calling for an external audit
of both comScore and NetRatings by the Media Ratings Council, the body
that certifies measurement practices of media ratings firms such as
radio's Arbitron (ARB).
"At this point, the only thing we know is that the results are
consistently different. What we don't know is why," says Sheryl
Draizen, IAB's senior vice-president and general manager. "The
differences between the numbers reported by comScore and NetRatings are
obviously a big issue for the industry as a whole."

Both comScore and NetRatings say they have begun working with the
MRC to get certified. But Draizen says the process is not happening
fast enough. "It should be a major priority for them," she says. "It is
a real issue to have such different numbers in the marketplace."

For Internet companies and advertisers, determining whose numbers
are correct is more important than just crowning the rightful platform
king. At stake are the tens of billions of advertising dollars destined
for the Web. Internet advertising is estimated to reach $16.4 billion
this year, according to research firm eMarketer. The number is expected
to grow to $25.2 billion in 2010. Which companies get that money,
particularly dollars earmarked for promoting brands and not just
directly selling merchandise, will depend largely on who can verify
their ad inventory and the size, composition, and engagement of their
audience.

May the Best Metric Win

ComScore and NetRatings each believes its own methods the best.
ComScore insists that its method of allowing new measurement methods
will establish it as the clear innovator. It also boasts that it is
able to better measure college students because it offers its software
for download over the Internet in exchange for games, screensavers,
security software and other items. "We feel we have the advantage,"
says Abraham.

Nielsen has an edge with its study panel, which was selected via
random telephone polls and thus, according to Bhatia, more
representative of the general population. He argues that only a
particular kind of computer user is comfortable downloading free
software over the Internet. "Fundamentally, the quality of the result
comes from the quality of the underlying panel," says Bhatia.

Who will win? That will depend largely on who is able to respond
fastest to the new technologies that impair the relevance of old
metrics, says Peter Daboll, a former president of comScore who now
heads Yahoo's global market research department. "Internal server log
data, panels—all have their limitations," says Daboll. "I think frankly
we just need more innovation."

 

 

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo via @jpenabickley

December 19, 2006No Comments

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo

Picture_8
The debate over which site had the most November page views reflects
the difficulty of tallying Web traffic, and billions of ad dollars are
at stake.  On the Web, the competition for most popular site can be as intense as
the race for the pennant or even the Presidency. So news that
up-and-comer MySpace.com beat incumbent Yahoo! (YHOO) for most monthly page views for the first time in November understandably grabbed headlines.

According to comScore Networks, News Corp.'s (NWS)
MySpace racked up 38.7 billion page views in November, compared with
38.1 billion for longtime leader Yahoo. But the dispatches concerning
the upset were the online equivalent of the famous headline "Dewey
Beats Truman."

Almost immediately, the results were called into question. UBS (UBS)
analyst Benjamin Schachter left voicemail messages for investors and
reporters warning against making decisions on comScore's potentially
unreliable data. Yahoo was still the undisputed leader, measured by
other key metrics, including unique visitors and time spent on the
site. Besides, Nielsen//NetRatings (NTRT),
comScore's main competitor, still had Yahoo leading page views in
November: 33.4 billion, vs. 29 billion for MySpace and the rest of News
Corp.'s Fox Interactive Media properties.

Focusing on Ad Impressions

Picture_9
The discrepancy has revived complaints about the accuracy of
reporting agencies' results, which often differ from companies' own
audience measurements (see BusinessWeek.com, 10/23/06, "Web Numbers: What's Real").
It also underscores the rivalry between comScore and
Nielsen//NetRatings for recognition as the most trusted source for
Web-traffic data. The winner, if one emerges, may set the standard for
how site popularity is measured, influencing how marketers dole out
billions in online ad dollars each year. Recognizing the high stakes in
that tussle, comScore and Nielsen//NetRatings both are refining their
tactics.

For starters, in the first quarter of 2007, comScore plans to change
how it determines the amount of advertising a Web company shows its
audience. To do that, comScore will focus on ad impressions, or the
number of times an ad shows up on a page, rather than the number of
times a Web page is viewed. The results can vary, depending on how a
Web page is designed.

For example, Yahoo and Google (GOOG)
are among companies that use a technology called Ajax that can change
an ad, influencing the number of ad impressions, even if the user
doesn't refresh or click to a different page. Yahoo attributed the 9%
drop in its page views, which allowed MySpace to overtake it, to its
inclusion of Ajax. Thus, page views—long used by industry analysts to
estimate how many ads a company can serve and, thus, potential
revenue—is no longer a reliable measurement.

Time Spent on a Site

ComScore is also planning to launch a set of entirely new ad metrics
in the second quarter of 2007, according to comScore Chief Executive
Officer Magid Abraham. "We are developing some proprietary metrics that
are a much better replacement for page views and are actually a better
measure of engagement," says Abraham.

Abraham is tight-lipped about specifics, but he says the new
techniques will better reflect the influence of new technologies. The
company will focus more on time spent on a site than page views. It's
worth noting that, by that estimate, Yahoo is the clear winner. Its
users spent 42.7 billion minutes on its pages in November. MySpace's
users spent a total of 13.8 billion minutes, says Abraham. 

Nielsen//NetRatings is also working on its measurement techniques in
response to new technologies. The firm developed a proposal several
months ago on how to track Ajax and improve tracking on other
technologies such as streaming media, says Manish Bhatia, NetRatings'
vice-president of global operations and U.S. sales.

Getting Certified

Changing the metrics alone, however, isn't enough to satisfy
everyone. The Interactive Advertising Bureau, an organization of
advertisers and major Web companies, is calling for an external audit
of both comScore and NetRatings by the Media Ratings Council, the body
that certifies measurement practices of media ratings firms such as
radio's Arbitron (ARB).
"At this point, the only thing we know is that the results are
consistently different. What we don't know is why," says Sheryl
Draizen, IAB's senior vice-president and general manager. "The
differences between the numbers reported by comScore and NetRatings are
obviously a big issue for the industry as a whole."

Both comScore and NetRatings say they have begun working with the
MRC to get certified. But Draizen says the process is not happening
fast enough. "It should be a major priority for them," she says. "It is
a real issue to have such different numbers in the marketplace."

For Internet companies and advertisers, determining whose numbers
are correct is more important than just crowning the rightful platform
king. At stake are the tens of billions of advertising dollars destined
for the Web. Internet advertising is estimated to reach $16.4 billion
this year, according to research firm eMarketer. The number is expected
to grow to $25.2 billion in 2010. Which companies get that money,
particularly dollars earmarked for promoting brands and not just
directly selling merchandise, will depend largely on who can verify
their ad inventory and the size, composition, and engagement of their
audience.

May the Best Metric Win

ComScore and NetRatings each believes its own methods the best.
ComScore insists that its method of allowing new measurement methods
will establish it as the clear innovator. It also boasts that it is
able to better measure college students because it offers its software
for download over the Internet in exchange for games, screensavers,
security software and other items. "We feel we have the advantage,"
says Abraham.

Nielsen has an edge with its study panel, which was selected via
random telephone polls and thus, according to Bhatia, more
representative of the general population. He argues that only a
particular kind of computer user is comfortable downloading free
software over the Internet. "Fundamentally, the quality of the result
comes from the quality of the underlying panel," says Bhatia.

Who will win? That will depend largely on who is able to respond
fastest to the new technologies that impair the relevance of old
metrics, says Peter Daboll, a former president of comScore who now
heads Yahoo's global market research department. "Internal server log
data, panels—all have their limitations," says Daboll. "I think frankly
we just need more innovation."

 

 

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo via @jpenabickley

September 8, 2006No Comments

ON: Another Ajax Conversion – Tiger

Picture_1_3
From Singapore another brand which looks for alternatives to full Flash websites: it's Tiger Beer, which also decided to opt for Ajax scripting.

ARC Singapore has recently developed a new website
whose structure is based on Ajax, and allows content to be easily
visualized in the countries where Tiger is concentrating its efforts
(Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore).

Flash hasn't disappeared,
but it's no longer the main technology used, and the result is still
appealing, even if the graphic style is not one of my favorites.

ON: Another Ajax Conversion – Tiger via @jpenabickley

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TALK: Making Magic with Ai

Ai is the tool of the modern magician. At the nascent stages of the another industrial and social revolution, magic + math, multiplied by design makes what is invariable hard — seem remarkably easy.

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