June 15, 2008No Comments

ON: Finding Me Qik

Qik video.  get it.  play with it. be one with it.

http://qik.com/player.swf?streamname=65a619968634486e8bb01fbcd3095866&vid=103851&playback=false&polling=false&user=kevin&userlock=true&islive=&username=anonymous


Qik
enables you to share moments of your life with your friends, family and the world - directly from your cell phone!
Keep your world in the know, share a laugh, tell engaging stories. Just point your cell phone and stream video live to your your friends on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, etc. OR use your cell phone like a camcorder and stream hours and hours of video without worrying about storage on your cell phone.

Picture_4

Get in to Qik at http://qik.com you can use it with our iPhone. Right now qik has 30 supported devices.

ON: Finding Me Qik via @jpenabickley

June 15, 2008No Comments

ON: Finding Me Qik

Qik video.  get it.  play with it. be one with it.

http://qik.com/player.swf?streamname=65a619968634486e8bb01fbcd3095866&vid=103851&playback=false&polling=false&user=kevin&userlock=true&islive=&username=anonymous


Qik
enables you to share moments of your life with your friends, family and the world - directly from your cell phone!
Keep your world in the know, share a laugh, tell engaging stories. Just point your cell phone and stream video live to your your friends on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, etc. OR use your cell phone like a camcorder and stream hours and hours of video without worrying about storage on your cell phone.

Picture_4

Get in to Qik at http://qik.com you can use it with our iPhone. Right now qik has 30 supported devices.

ON: Finding Me Qik via @jpenabickley

August 13, 2007No Comments

ON: The Clutter Control Freak Blog

The Clutter Control Freak Blog on behalf of Stacks and Stacks, a California-based houseware retailer. The company's staff of experts, along with 10 bloggers, will write about ways to get organized.

Picture_1_2

The site will make organizing fun for its readers in the form of user-generated posts, video, a photo section called Freak of the Week, and additional sub-sections such as Stay or Go, Before & After house pics and House Tours that readers will vote on.  This is a nice site and a relevant idea but there are to many things on the site that have "coming soon" notes.

ON: The Clutter Control Freak Blog via @jpenabickley

August 13, 2007No Comments

ON: The Clutter Control Freak Blog

The Clutter Control Freak Blog on behalf of Stacks and Stacks, a California-based houseware retailer. The company's staff of experts, along with 10 bloggers, will write about ways to get organized.

Picture_1_2

The site will make organizing fun for its readers in the form of user-generated posts, video, a photo section called Freak of the Week, and additional sub-sections such as Stay or Go, Before & After house pics and House Tours that readers will vote on.  This is a nice site and a relevant idea but there are to many things on the site that have "coming soon" notes.

ON: The Clutter Control Freak Blog via @jpenabickley

August 13, 2007No Comments

ON: The Clutter Control Freak Blog

The Clutter Control Freak Blog on behalf of Stacks and Stacks, a California-based houseware retailer. The company's staff of experts, along with 10 bloggers, will write about ways to get organized.

Picture_1_2

The site will make organizing fun for its readers in the form of user-generated posts, video, a photo section called Freak of the Week, and additional sub-sections such as Stay or Go, Before & After house pics and House Tours that readers will vote on.  This is a nice site and a relevant idea but there are to many things on the site that have "coming soon" notes.

ON: The Clutter Control Freak Blog via @jpenabickley

January 4, 2007No Comments

ON: Social Media & Buzz Metrics

Last year was a watershed for social media, with millions of people
creating and sharing their own media on sites such as MySpace, YouTube,
and Flickr and turning away from traditional one-way media such as TV, radio
and newspapers. But for the proprietors of these new media sites,
there’s one very big problem: How do you make money off that popularity?

The conundrum for social media is that if you try to commercialize
that user-generated space, it loses its allure for the user who wants
to be in control. But for research companies, there’s no conundrum —
just a good niche to exploit for juicy data. One company stepping into
that niche is Nielsen BuzzMetrics, an amalgamation
of three other companies — BuzzMetrics (word-of-mouth marketing),
Trendum (linguistic analysis) and Intelliseek (enterprise search)—
which merged last year under the Nielsen/VNU umbrella. The idea for
Nielsen BuzzMetrics is to measure buzz in social media such as blogs,
forums and usenet groups and then package that data for corporate
clients.

Marketers at companies such as Toyota, Sony and Coca-Cola have
tapped BuzzMetrics to tell them what people on social media sites are
saying about their brands and products. If they can gauge and nurture
this buzz, the marketers hope to eventually turn positive buzz into
sales. But building buzz online has its pitfalls, as various companies
from Wal-Mart to Sony have found with the recent fake-blog scandals in which marketing blogs posed as fan-generated content and were outed by the blogosphere.

Using that site, I checked out the way the conversation about Saddam Hussein’s execution
changed over the past weekend, as the cell phone video leaked out to
various blogs. You can also compare trends like the number of times
bloggers mention “mother” vs. “father” (mom always seems to double up
on dad, with a spike in both mentions around Christmas).

Fun facts aside, the ground is shifting mightily under
the feet of corporate marketers, who need to follow changes in online
opinion even before a product comes to market. One recent pilot project
for BuzzMetrics combined grocery sales of certain foods with the online
buzz around trendy diets. Not too surprisingly, people were talking
about low-carb diets for months before sales of such foods actually
went up at the cash registers.

Read more about more on this topic at http://nielsenbuzzmetrics.com/mouthpiece/index.html

Or read more of
Mark Glaser's piece at: http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/

ON: Social Media & Buzz Metrics via @jpenabickley

December 20, 2006No Comments

ON: Consumer-Generated Media

The Internet, far more than any other medium, has given consumers a voice, a publishing platform and a forum where their collective voices can be heard, shared and researched.

"Consumer-Generated Media" (CGM) encompasses the millions of consumer-generated comments, opinions and personal experiences posted in
   publicly available online sources on a wide range of issues, topics, products and brands. CGM is also referred to as Online Consumer Word-of-Mouth or Online Consumer Buzz. CGM originates from:

  • Blogs
  • Message boards and forums
  • Public discussions (Usenet newsgroups)
  • Discussions and forums on large email portals (Yahoo!,AOL, MSN)
  • Online opinion/review sites and services
  • Online feedback/complaint sites

Why is CGM Important?

First, consumers place far more trust in their fellow consumers than
   they do in traditional marketers and advertisers, according to research. For any marketer, advertiser or business professional trying to be heard or break through the clutter, understanding and managing this high-impact CGM is critical for marketplace understanding and success.

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Secondly, CGM is prolific and increasingly easy and inexpensive
   to create. Online discussion forms, membership groups, boards and
   Usenet newsgroups represented the first CGM wave. Blogs and online
   videos represent the latest wave of CGM that's easy and inexpensive
   to distribute…and influential in its impact.

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* Numbers provided are projected based on Nielsen BuzzMetrics estimates for
English language CGM sources and postings, and are average estimates for
  the year.

Likewise, CGM influences traditional marketing in wholly new ways. Because CGM data is easy to find on search engines, marketers and advertisers no longer "control" the message or the medium. When a consumer types
   a company name, brand or product into a search engine, it's almost certain that some of the first results—good or bad—will be posted and created by other consumers. In addition, the media, analysts, regulators, competitors and other stakeholders encounter this readily available CGM “reference material” when they’re researching issues, topics and trends online.

CGM is dramatically altering the marketing landscape, there are many services like Nielsen Buzz Metrics, comScore and eMarketer that give marketers and intelligence professionals an advantage by locating,measuring and analyzing CGM in wholly new ways so that it's understandable,real-time and actionable.

Does CGM come in different formats?
Catalyzed by the explosive growth of the Internet, CGM includes opinions, advice, consumer-to-consumer discussions, reviews, shared personal experiences, photos, images, videos, even podcasts and webcasts. And who knows what’s next?

The ClickZ Library

A series of easy-to-understand articles on CGM can beound in the links below.

  • The Pocket Guide to Consumer-Generated Media
    Quick CGM basics, from message boards to forums to blogs to consumer-generated
       multi-media (CGM2) http://www.clickz.com/experts/brand/cmo/article.php/3515576

  • How to Act on Consumer Generated Media
    This piece covers 12 areas of CGM actionalability for marketers and business leaders, from search engine advertising to message optimization.  A must-read! http://www.clickz.com/experts/brand/cmo/article.php/3560271

  • Consumer "Surveillance" and Consumer-Generated Multi-Media (CGM2)
    This article discusses how the explosion of new gadgetry is allowing consumers to push expression to deeper, more penetrating, and more persuasive levels of impact.  Their activity is creating a consumer-controlled “surveillance culture” that promises to rewrite the rules of brand management.
    http://www.clickz.com/experts/brand/cmo/article.php/3576076

  • CGM and the Rebirth of Television: This article, entitled "TV is Dead, Long Live TV," argues
       that TV is finding a new voice, new outlets and a new context, thanks to
       the explosion of consumer-generated media.  "Make no mistake…TV is reinventing itself." Learn why here. http://www.clickz.com/experts/brand/cmo/article.php/3563881

  • Is CGM a Long-Term Strategy? This essay argues that companies and brands need a long-term focus
       to reap the ultimate rewards of CGM.  It also challenges the notion
       that brands can simply "push a button" and generate or acquire positive buzz. http://www.clickz.com/experts/brand/cmo/article.php/3553036

  • Understanding the Relationship Between "Emotion" and Consumer-Generated Media: Emotion and consumer-generated media go hand in hand. Moreover, brands can better forecast and predict virality and word-of-mouth levels by simply getting a handle on the depth of emotion consumers feel after a product, brand, or service "experience." http://www.clickz.com/experts/brand/cmo/article.php/3566781

Consumer-Generated Media: A Vocabulary Guide: If you’re confused by the terminology that surrounds consumer-generated media, never fear. Nielsen BuzzMetrics has compiled a guide to the jargon that you’ll encounter. Check out our Get Smart Guide: Quick Vocabulary at your Fingertips.

 

 

 

   
   

 

 

ON: Consumer-Generated Media via @jpenabickley

October 18, 2006No Comments

Is Your Brand Safe?

Are you pro or against working with ad networks?
Why?

If you, either through an internal department or an agency, work with ad networks, are you happy with the placements your ads get through ad networks?
Why or why not?

What is your biggest fear about relying on ad networks for the placement of your ads?
How have you tackled this?

Should mid sized & smaller publishers (the interactive ad long tail) be made to categorize their content in an open market place?

If so who should regulate and publicize publisher compliance?

If there were such a service would you pay for membership that helped protect brands through categorization and fine based penalties for non compliance?

Add to Technorati Favorites

Is Your Brand Safe? via @jpenabickley

October 18, 2006No Comments

The Online Ad Game

There are so many aspects to the online advertising space that confuse marketers and agencies who act as the client advocate in the interactive space. After conducting a number of industry interviews with ad agencies and advertisers I have found that there is market confusion around ad networks and the safety of your brand.

Over the next few posts I thought I would address some high level issues and recruit your feedback and ideas in this forum to begin an open dialog with the best of our industry in order to develop a strategy and possibly an organization that will begin to guide the interactive ad industry in a positive direction that will inevitably lead to larger online ad spending from advertisers for 2007.

Ad Networks
Historically, an organization charged with the representation of advertising space for a group of Web sites for the purpose of maximizing revenue and minimizing administrative costs through aggregation. The role of an Internet advertising network is to transact, serve, track and report the distribution of creative from advertisers to publishers using an efficient, interactive marketplace.

Today they have become sophisticated operations designed to allow advertisers to place their advertising materials in front of selected individuals.  The typical selling proposition of a network is that these individuals are good prospects for the particular product or service on offer. But ad networks differ in several ways, including:

  1. How the your audience or individuals are selected or targeted
  2. The range of publishers' sites on which the advertisements may appear

A network can also be categorized according to the nature of the financial arrangement between the advertiser, the network and the publisher.

  1. The True Network= bases on revenue sharing agreements across a wide range of sites
  2. Arbitrage network = buys unused, unwanted remnant inventory at bargain prices in hopes of repackaging and reselling it profitably
  3. The Broker network = simply manages the transactions and adds little value for advertisers.

The beauty of the Ad Network, dependant on type, business emphasis, organization and approach, is that most networks offer a range of options, including demographic, geographic and dayparting. Many allow advertisers to mix and match various types of selectivity, creating a near infinite range of possibilities for finding specific categories of prospects and serving them targeted messages.

So why do Ad Networks have such a bad rap with advertisers and agencies alike?

One answer could be….
While ad networks offer increased reach ad networks also offer less control for brand advertisers. Marketers placing impressions on an ad network will be challenged to keep tabs on where their advertising appears. Marketers are justly vigilant about protecting their brand -- especially online, where they must inevitably give up a degree of control -- but ad networks can be particularly frustrating.

  1. Who do you hold responsible when you brand shows up on inappropriate content?
  2. How can you hold the agency, ad networks or publishers accountable?
  3. Is your Brand truly Safe without some sort of industry standard categorization of content?

Sound off...

Add to Technorati Favorites

The Online Ad Game via @jpenabickley

October 5, 2006No Comments

ON: 56% of Active Gamers Are Online, 64% Are Women

Among the roughly 117 million "Active Gamers" in the U.S. in 2006, more
than half (56 percent) play games online, and 64 percent of all online
gamers are women, according to Nielsen Entertainment's third annual Active Gamer Benchmark Study, released
Thursday. Moreover, though teenagers still constitute the largest
percentage (40 percent) of active gamers, more than 15 million of those
gamers (almost 8 percent) are now 45 years old or older.

Although women make up nearly two-thirds of all online gamers, men
outnumber women in the overall videogame universe by more than two to
one. And although older females make up the largest percentage of
casual gamers, active gamer teens and young adults comprise a
considerable portion of this market, with more than half playing casual
games an hour or more a week.

The social elements of videogames are becoming an increasingly
important part of the gaming experience, with those in the active
gamers category spending more than five hours a week playing games
socially. Some 64 percent of active gamers play on PC-based systems,
which offer users connected experiences through massively multiplayer
online games (MMOG) that other platforms cannot yet match. Personal
computers also are the platform of choice for players of casual games,
especially among women.

TOLD YOU SO...

ON: 56% of Active Gamers Are Online, 64% Are Women via @jpenabickley
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