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May 9, 2009No Comments

ON: The 5% That Actually Use Twitter

Twitterdocumentwide

Last week the the boys from Twitter, Evan Williams, Biz Stone and Jack Dorsey, visited the talking heads in the mainstream media after Time Magazine acknowledged them in their list of 100 Most Influential People in 2009. In the same week, the Harris Interactive Poll released a report via Media Post that has a few interesting stats as well as a few negative statements that has lead me to believe that many marketers, agencies and some social media "experts" have Twitter all wrong.  As a matter of fact, I ponder if brands that are there and not tweeting relevant insider or expert information to their followers understand that they are at risk of damaging their brands.

Thanks to @ev, @biz and @jack's many interviews we have found a few facts that we can build on.

  • Twitter is not a social network. (you are)
  • Twitter is a a succession of chirps as uttered by birds.
  • Twitter allows you to tweet to people who are willing to follow you.
  • You are an influencer to those who follow you.
  • Twitter is a wonderful forum for real people, companies and brand people with influence to broadcast messages.
  • Twitter allows for asynchronous "relationships"

The Skinny From Harris:

  • 74% of those aged 18-34 years old
    have a Facebook or MySpace account but this quickly drops off the older
    one gets. Only 24% of those 55 and older have an account
  • 8% of 18-34 year olds use Twitter, 7% of those 35-44 use it, 4% of those aged 45-54 and just 1% of those 55 and older
  • Men
    and women use Twitter at the same levels (5% each), but women are more
    likely to have a Facebook or MySpace account (52% versus 45%)
  • Two
    in five people with a high school degree or less have a Facebook or
    MySpace account compared to 55% of those with some college and 52% of
    those with at least a college degree.

So while the mainstream media may have found Twitter, only 5% of American consumers are currently using it. That 5% are more highly
educated and potentially more influential in a general sense if for no
other reason than traditional media's embrace of Twitter.

Data from Harris:

Online Social Network Usage - By Age & Gender (All Online Adults; % of Age Group)

Age Group

Gender

Network Usage

Total

18-34

35-44

45-54

55+

Male

Female

Have a Facebook or MySpace account

48%

74

47

41

24

45

52

Update Facebook or MySpace account at least once a day

16

29

17

10

3

14

18

Use Twitter (Net)

5

8

7

4

1

5

5

  Follow people on Twitter

5

8

6

4

1

5

5

  Use Twitter to send messages

3

4

5

1

*

3

2

None of these

51

25

50

59

76

54

47'

Source: Harris Interactive, April 2009  Multiple responses allowed; * indicates less than 0.5%

Online Social Network Usage - By Education (All Online Adults; % of Group)

Education

Network Usage

Total

HS or less

Some College

College Grad+

Have a Facebook or MySpace account

48%

40

55

52

Update Facebook or MySpace account at least once a day

16

14

18

16

Use Twitter (Net)

5

3

7

6

  Follow people on Twitter

5

3

6

6

  Use Twitter to send messages

3

1

4

4

None of these

51

59

43

47

Source: Harris Interactive, April 2009  Multiple responses allowed; * indicates less than 0.5%

In my experience in creating new ideas for brands Twitter has proven to
help me reach influencers following me who are interested in specific topics such as
racing, music, the elections and movies. (there are many many more topics)

If brands are dedicated to "engagement" then they must also be dedicated to building a library of content in strategically relevant areas.  This content can offer influencer's a chance to passionately evangelize the brands value over time. Twitter is the perfect platform to begin using your brand as a filter.  Can you name a few brands that are using Twitter to generate new interest, traffic and response to their offerings?

If you have not done so, you should join Twitter and see for yourselves.

ON: The 5% That Actually Use Twitter via @jpenabickley

November 1, 2007No Comments

ON: HBO’s VOYEUR

Hbovoyeur

Are you out there?  Are your thoughts out there for all to be read or watched?  Do you twitter?  Do you live in the Social Networks, do you v-blog?  Do we digital practitioners suffer from a form of  voyeurism?  Check out the new HBO website for the multi-media stories that HBO has built around the theme of voyeurism.  Check it out and tell me if you see any parallels. 

Check it out at http://www.hbovoyeur.com/

ON: HBO’s VOYEUR via @jpenabickley

November 1, 2007No Comments

ON: HBO’s VOYEUR

Hbovoyeur

Are you out there?  Are your thoughts out there for all to be read or watched?  Do you twitter?  Do you live in the Social Networks, do you v-blog?  Do we digital practitioners suffer from a form of  voyeurism?  Check out the new HBO website for the multi-media stories that HBO has built around the theme of voyeurism.  Check it out and tell me if you see any parallels. 

Check it out at http://www.hbovoyeur.com/

ON: HBO’s VOYEUR via @jpenabickley

August 1, 20073 Comments

ON: Technology’s Place in a Marketer’s Brand

Today I was writing up concepts that were devoid of medium, they were pure ideas, pure messages.  Messages that evoked or contained emotion (shinny happy people).  On the way home as I putz-ed around with my new iPhone (yes .. I broke down and got one, and i love it!) I came to a conclusion on my approach to ideation. Its an idea no matter the medium.  One might express a creative vision for a brand in focus of the space they create in.

I am so tired of marketers approaching digital with fatigued or jaded attitudes.  Technology is not our focus.. Changing human behavior (buying habits) through the use of media is.

What technology has done is made it easy to do what was once burdensome and thus expensive. Technology has fundamentally linked the path of development in our (Western) society, and is wrapped up in our ideology. From time-to-time we use it as an instrument of our power relations as well.

Most often, technology is presented as a neutral enabler. However, on inspection, this is not the case all the time.  The web browser which enables us to seek out information and experiences does have its limitations, as does my mobile phone as does my television and even my car.  All mediums have limitations. As creative thinkers we must look as those limitations as opportunities to use creative thought in our executions.

In today’s marketplace of social media, social networks, vertical networks, in world networks and business networks we must target consumer behaviors as opposed to their age.  I think age and household income is important identifiers of the consumer segment, but the most important information we can have when crafting a brands strategy and relevant creative is… What are our consumers doing in our medium? How are they behaving online? 

When we answer that the ideas begin to flow and are naturally, simple and relevant.

Go forth and create!

ON: Technology’s Place in a Marketer’s Brand via @jpenabickley

December 18, 20062 Comments

ON: Drive Sales by Directing Searchers to Forums

By now it's something every marketer knows: That smaller -- albeit
powerful -- group of brand fans can have an exponentially greater
influence. But what many don't know is how to use search and social
media to turn up the volume on these people.  Search is built on forums.  You have to have a strategy that says: 'Let's
make sure the opinions of these people are heard.'"

Picture_6_5

Research from Yahoo and ComScore underscores how valuable doing so can
be. Brand advocates of auto marketers, for example, influence 52% more
people than none advocates. The reason why they should is simple math. Of about 144
million internet adults, about 13.5 million purchased a vehicle in the
last six months. About 5.1 million of those were advocates who, on
average, talked to about 20 people each about the purchase, for a total
of 105 million people. About 8.3 million of those car buyers were
nonadvocates, who talked to eight people about the purchase, for a
total of 69 million people who heard about it.

The research pinned some digital traits on these influencers: They
conduct about 25% more online searches, they have wider online social
circles, are 119% more likely to use instant messenger and 40% more
likely to use podcasts. And about half have written about their
purchases online.

They're also more than twice as likely as nonadvocates to lead to
sales. About 718,000 friends purchased cars recommended by the 5.1
million advocate car buyers while 502,000 people purchased cars
recommended by the 8.3 million nonadvocate car buyers. And perhaps
surprisingly, advocates are more likely to talk about positive
experiences they've had with brands than nonadvocates are.

Don't fear spontaneity
B
rands
should be less afraid of all the spontaneous chatter about their
products going on throughout the internet because it's actually more
positive than most marketers might assume. For example, a search on
Flickr for Pringles reveals hundreds of pictures showing the brand in
an innocuous -- and often creative -- light. People find a much bigger upside than they were aware of [when it comes to online brand chatter].

Examples of how advertisers are using those influencers through
social-media programs such as the Honda Element MySpace program, a
Nikon-sponsored Flickr gallery and a deal between CompUSA and
Bazaarvoice, a company that helps retailers add consumer reviews to
their sites.

Pattern changes
CompUSA, for example, bought the keywords Sony-plus-review and sent
searchers not to the Sony section of the CompUSA site but to the Sony
user-review section of the site. Doing so sent sale conversions soaring
60% and each purchaser was spending 50% more than the ones coming
through the official Sony section of the CompUSA site. Thanks to the internet, purchasing patterns have been irrevocably
changed and now we're showing word of mouth has been irrevocably
changed.

Don't try too hard
If a marketer screws up in the
social-media space by, say, selling too hard or obviously or trying to
censor negative comments, the repercussions can be more severe.
There's a stronger impact when you do it wrong in social
media than when you mess up in a TV commercial because it's
more personal. Imagine, if I threw a dinner party and then
tried to sell you Tupperware afterward. You'd never come back.

ON: Drive Sales by Directing Searchers to Forums via @jpenabickley

December 10, 20061 Comment

ON: Living The Dream & Branded Social Networks

Picture_2_13

Although advertisers are keen to monetize the behemoth that is the
social networking phenomenon, previous attempts have varied from the
successful (Nike’s Joga Bonito, for example) to the misguided (Walmart’s short lived ‘The Hub’. Now, US car manufacturer Lincoln are uniting people online through a shared dream – literally. www.mydream.tv
is a beautifully laid out site through which users can sign up, submit
their dreams and ambitions, and connect with others harboring the same
desires in order to make dreams come true. Video footage showing
individuals explaining how they overcame difficulties to reach their
personal goals is also featured, alongside relevant Amazon links to help people get set up with the right equipment.

The site was conceived and constructed by New York-based renegades Kirt Gunn,
who supervised the true life footage. The site has three value
propositions, First, it’s there for information and
entertainment. We’ve included relevant web links next to each dream to
help people get started, and Amazon guides. Second, we’ve given users
the chance to connect with others, motivating them to not only
accomplish their goals but also return to the site to encourage others.
And third, shortly we’ll be launching the user-generated element in
which users will be able to add their own videos of success.

So
far, featured dreams include building a dream house, making an
independent film and the slightly more dramatic ‘become a superhero’.
Oh, and the site also plays host to Lincoln advertising and a
competition to win one of the cars.

Creating a social network is a tricky business, as both content and
connections must be continually inspiring. With MyDream.tv we suspect
Lincoln may have cracked it – what could be more inspiring than a
dream?

Picture_1_18
Other automotive news – Toyota Scion has formed an online network, Scion Broadband,
with five channels of content including short films, music videos and a
Japanese anime cartoon series. There’ll also be exclusive footage of
new Scion commercials, and the music channel will feature videos and
interviews with up-and-coming artists. ‘Our customer is very plugged
into the arts, but they are also plugged in online,’ said Adrian Si,
Scion’s interactive manager. ‘Most of them are finding links to
entertainment on the Internet, and a growing amount are just staying
online to be entertained. We feel that we can provide our audience with
relevant content’. www.scion.com/broadband

AND – the manufacturer has cemented its presence in Second Life with a brand new showroom, Scion City.
The launch of the model in Second Life was so well attended that Scion
will host six more events, one every two weeks, to let players' avatars
dance, hear concerts, and test-drive Scions. http://secondlife.com

ON: Living The Dream & Branded Social Networks via @jpenabickley

September 13, 2006No Comments

ON: Trendsetters & New Influencers

Tech futurist Paul Saffo writes:

“The Web is moving from being
a place where people access information to a place where people access other
people in an information-rich environment”. 

We find examples of that in sites and communities like Linked In, MySpace and YouTube.

We refer to this phenomenon by a number of names: social media, web 2.0, user- generated
content, social networks.
But not a lot is
said about the difference between the handful of contributors who take the time
to espouse an opinion, and those who are passive consumers of that message. 

The
Guardian Unlimited
has suggested a 1% rule: “an emerging rule of
thumb that suggests that if you get a group of 100 people online then one will
create content, 10 will "interact" with it (commenting or offering
improvements) and the other 89 will just view it”.  Microsoft’s Don Dodge offers
a simple
illustration
of this phenomenon.

Pyramid_1

New Influencers rate Amazon reviews, add comments to Yahoo
news stories, post video replies on YouTube. New Influencers see their improvements on the work of others as a form
of self-expression and a way to gain social currency. By interacting with original content, they
validate an author’s expertise. And they
are just as valuable to the social network as content creators.

Consider, too, some statistics from that other community content
generation project, Wikipedia: 50% of all Wikipedia article edits are
done by 0.7% of users, and more than 70% of all articles have been
written by just 1.8% of all users, according to the Church of the
Customer blog (http://customerevangelists.typepad.com/blog/).

Earlier
metrics garnered from community sites suggested that about 80% of
content was produced by 20% of the users, but the growing number of
data points is creating a clearer picture of how Web 2.0 groups need to
think. For instance, a site that demands too much interaction and
content generation from users will see nine out of 10 people just pass
by.

ON: Trendsetters & New Influencers via @jpenabickley

September 13, 2006No Comments

ON: Trendsetters & New Influencers

Tech futurist Paul Saffo writes:

“The Web is moving from being
a place where people access information to a place where people access other
people in an information-rich environment”. 

We find examples of that in sites and communities like Linked In, MySpace and YouTube.

We refer to this phenomenon by a number of names: social media, web 2.0, user- generated
content, social networks.
But not a lot is
said about the difference between the handful of contributors who take the time
to espouse an opinion, and those who are passive consumers of that message. 

The
Guardian Unlimited
has suggested a 1% rule: “an emerging rule of
thumb that suggests that if you get a group of 100 people online then one will
create content, 10 will "interact" with it (commenting or offering
improvements) and the other 89 will just view it”.  Microsoft’s Don Dodge offers
a simple
illustration
of this phenomenon.

Pyramid_1

New Influencers rate Amazon reviews, add comments to Yahoo
news stories, post video replies on YouTube. New Influencers see their improvements on the work of others as a form
of self-expression and a way to gain social currency. By interacting with original content, they
validate an author’s expertise. And they
are just as valuable to the social network as content creators.

Consider, too, some statistics from that other community content
generation project, Wikipedia: 50% of all Wikipedia article edits are
done by 0.7% of users, and more than 70% of all articles have been
written by just 1.8% of all users, according to the Church of the
Customer blog (http://customerevangelists.typepad.com/blog/).

Earlier
metrics garnered from community sites suggested that about 80% of
content was produced by 20% of the users, but the growing number of
data points is creating a clearer picture of how Web 2.0 groups need to
think. For instance, a site that demands too much interaction and
content generation from users will see nine out of 10 people just pass
by.

ON: Trendsetters & New Influencers via @jpenabickley

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