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February 17, 2011No Comments

on: social customer service

The IAB and Lightspeed Research conducted a detailed study into what social network users expect in terms of online customer service – with 45% of respondents having complained online compared with 36% who have complained by phone – showing that the internet is the most common place to complain. It seems that younger people are more determined to receive a quick response – 19% of the 18-34 demographic want a response within an hour, although most people are happy as long as they receive a response within 24 hours.

on: social customer service via @jpenabickley

August 4, 2010No Comments

on: a little privacy

The IAB tells congress that It's privacy bills may harm business and consumers. Mike Zaneis, Vice President of Public Policy, testified before the U.S. Congress to express the advertising industry’s serious reservations about two legislative proposals that jeopardize the Internet and the interactive advertising that has made possible an explosion of new information, communications and entertainment.

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f8/607703002

With all of the social data being posted in public, can we self regulate before we get to close to people's private matters?  can all this data lead to predictive algorithms engines run amuck?

[via IAB]

on: a little privacy via @jpenabickley

December 23, 2007No Comments

ON: The IAB’s Rich Media Measurement Guidelines

Picture_1After a 30-day period of public comment and review, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) has published the Rich Media Measurement Guidelines.  IAB "Rich media" ads are online ads with elements that users can
interact with. Formats include transitional (interstitial) and
over-the-page units (floating ads, page tear-backs and take-overs).

The new measurement guidelines determine the point at which a rich
media ad impression is counted. Generally, a measurement will be
considered legitimate when an ad counter receives and responds to an
HTTP request for a tracking asset from a user's browser.  This is considered as late as possible in "the delivery of creative
material to the user’s browser and therefore closest to the actual
opportunity to see by the user."

Ad counters are also required to employ standard headers on the response, to minimize caching.

Wireless, offline cached media, interactive television, "flash tracking" and flash sites were not covered in the guidelines.  To help educate practitioners and others about rich media
measurement, the IAB is hosting a webinar on Wednesday, January 23rd,
between 4-5 PM Eastern.

Download the Rich Media Measurement Guidelines. Those inclined may register for the webinar at the same URL.

The standards, which cover online browser or browser-equivale
nt
based internet activity, are positioned as addendum to existing IAB Ad Impression Measurement Guidelines, which were published in 2004.  The addendum was facilitated by the Media Rating Council, and the
final product was warmly applauded by the Association of National
Advertisers.

ON: The IAB’s Rich Media Measurement Guidelines via @jpenabickley

September 24, 2007No Comments

ON: Day One at Mixx

Outside

I spent the day at the Mixx conference for the most part of the morning.  I will say that if you are a person who spends her/his time at the leading edge, walking the floor of the Expo was not where the action was.  As a matter of fact I would say it was a line up of the usual suspects.  That said, the workshops and the opening remarks made the Microsoft rubber chicken worth while.  As a matter of fact it fueled the the fire for more Blue (more to come on what Fusing of the Blue is...)

Key takeaways:

  • The traditional marketer/agency framework is over.
  • We as advertisers must join the conversation.
  • It's not just about servicing customers online.  It's about furthering engagement.
  • Never stop experimenting.
  • The challenge for us is that we need let go of the creative process.
  • In order to create the authentic dialog, it requires for us to let
    go and let those who create do what they do best and create that
    dialog.
  • Armed with a megaphone like the web, consumers wield enormous power.
  • The era of brands and agencies creating the messages is over.

Raise your glasses to a new class of advertising and organizations that spring up and define the way brands can capture the minds and hearts of audiences while driving loyalty as well as spend in retail.

Lunch

It was a packed house and clearly was the "official" interactive event of Advertising Week.

ON: Day One at Mixx via @jpenabickley

September 24, 2007No Comments

ON: Day One at Mixx

Outside

I spent the day at the Mixx conference for the most part of the morning.  I will say that if you are a person who spends her/his time at the leading edge, walking the floor of the Expo was not where the action was.  As a matter of fact I would say it was a line up of the usual suspects.  That said, the workshops and the opening remarks made the Microsoft rubber chicken worth while.  As a matter of fact it fueled the the fire for more Blue (more to come on what Fusing of the Blue is...)

Key takeaways:

  • The traditional marketer/agency framework is over.
  • We as advertisers must join the conversation.
  • It's not just about servicing customers online.  It's about furthering engagement.
  • Never stop experimenting.
  • The challenge for us is that we need let go of the creative process.
  • In order to create the authentic dialog, it requires for us to let
    go and let those who create do what they do best and create that
    dialog.
  • Armed with a megaphone like the web, consumers wield enormous power.
  • The era of brands and agencies creating the messages is over.

Raise your glasses to a new class of advertising and organizations that spring up and define the way brands can capture the minds and hearts of audiences while driving loyalty as well as spend in retail.

Lunch

It was a packed house and clearly was the "official" interactive event of Advertising Week.

ON: Day One at Mixx via @jpenabickley

December 19, 2006No Comments

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo

Picture_8
The debate over which site had the most November page views reflects
the difficulty of tallying Web traffic, and billions of ad dollars are
at stake.  On the Web, the competition for most popular site can be as intense as
the race for the pennant or even the Presidency. So news that
up-and-comer MySpace.com beat incumbent Yahoo! (YHOO) for most monthly page views for the first time in November understandably grabbed headlines.

According to comScore Networks, News Corp.'s (NWS)
MySpace racked up 38.7 billion page views in November, compared with
38.1 billion for longtime leader Yahoo. But the dispatches concerning
the upset were the online equivalent of the famous headline "Dewey
Beats Truman."

Almost immediately, the results were called into question. UBS (UBS)
analyst Benjamin Schachter left voicemail messages for investors and
reporters warning against making decisions on comScore's potentially
unreliable data. Yahoo was still the undisputed leader, measured by
other key metrics, including unique visitors and time spent on the
site. Besides, Nielsen//NetRatings (NTRT),
comScore's main competitor, still had Yahoo leading page views in
November: 33.4 billion, vs. 29 billion for MySpace and the rest of News
Corp.'s Fox Interactive Media properties.

Focusing on Ad Impressions

Picture_9
The discrepancy has revived complaints about the accuracy of
reporting agencies' results, which often differ from companies' own
audience measurements (see BusinessWeek.com, 10/23/06, "Web Numbers: What's Real").
It also underscores the rivalry between comScore and
Nielsen//NetRatings for recognition as the most trusted source for
Web-traffic data. The winner, if one emerges, may set the standard for
how site popularity is measured, influencing how marketers dole out
billions in online ad dollars each year. Recognizing the high stakes in
that tussle, comScore and Nielsen//NetRatings both are refining their
tactics.

For starters, in the first quarter of 2007, comScore plans to change
how it determines the amount of advertising a Web company shows its
audience. To do that, comScore will focus on ad impressions, or the
number of times an ad shows up on a page, rather than the number of
times a Web page is viewed. The results can vary, depending on how a
Web page is designed.

For example, Yahoo and Google (GOOG)
are among companies that use a technology called Ajax that can change
an ad, influencing the number of ad impressions, even if the user
doesn't refresh or click to a different page. Yahoo attributed the 9%
drop in its page views, which allowed MySpace to overtake it, to its
inclusion of Ajax. Thus, page views—long used by industry analysts to
estimate how many ads a company can serve and, thus, potential
revenue—is no longer a reliable measurement.

Time Spent on a Site

ComScore is also planning to launch a set of entirely new ad metrics
in the second quarter of 2007, according to comScore Chief Executive
Officer Magid Abraham. "We are developing some proprietary metrics that
are a much better replacement for page views and are actually a better
measure of engagement," says Abraham.

Abraham is tight-lipped about specifics, but he says the new
techniques will better reflect the influence of new technologies. The
company will focus more on time spent on a site than page views. It's
worth noting that, by that estimate, Yahoo is the clear winner. Its
users spent 42.7 billion minutes on its pages in November. MySpace's
users spent a total of 13.8 billion minutes, says Abraham. 

Nielsen//NetRatings is also working on its measurement techniques in
response to new technologies. The firm developed a proposal several
months ago on how to track Ajax and improve tracking on other
technologies such as streaming media, says Manish Bhatia, NetRatings'
vice-president of global operations and U.S. sales.

Getting Certified

Changing the metrics alone, however, isn't enough to satisfy
everyone. The Interactive Advertising Bureau, an organization of
advertisers and major Web companies, is calling for an external audit
of both comScore and NetRatings by the Media Ratings Council, the body
that certifies measurement practices of media ratings firms such as
radio's Arbitron (ARB).
"At this point, the only thing we know is that the results are
consistently different. What we don't know is why," says Sheryl
Draizen, IAB's senior vice-president and general manager. "The
differences between the numbers reported by comScore and NetRatings are
obviously a big issue for the industry as a whole."

Both comScore and NetRatings say they have begun working with the
MRC to get certified. But Draizen says the process is not happening
fast enough. "It should be a major priority for them," she says. "It is
a real issue to have such different numbers in the marketplace."

For Internet companies and advertisers, determining whose numbers
are correct is more important than just crowning the rightful platform
king. At stake are the tens of billions of advertising dollars destined
for the Web. Internet advertising is estimated to reach $16.4 billion
this year, according to research firm eMarketer. The number is expected
to grow to $25.2 billion in 2010. Which companies get that money,
particularly dollars earmarked for promoting brands and not just
directly selling merchandise, will depend largely on who can verify
their ad inventory and the size, composition, and engagement of their
audience.

May the Best Metric Win

ComScore and NetRatings each believes its own methods the best.
ComScore insists that its method of allowing new measurement methods
will establish it as the clear innovator. It also boasts that it is
able to better measure college students because it offers its software
for download over the Internet in exchange for games, screensavers,
security software and other items. "We feel we have the advantage,"
says Abraham.

Nielsen has an edge with its study panel, which was selected via
random telephone polls and thus, according to Bhatia, more
representative of the general population. He argues that only a
particular kind of computer user is comfortable downloading free
software over the Internet. "Fundamentally, the quality of the result
comes from the quality of the underlying panel," says Bhatia.

Who will win? That will depend largely on who is able to respond
fastest to the new technologies that impair the relevance of old
metrics, says Peter Daboll, a former president of comScore who now
heads Yahoo's global market research department. "Internal server log
data, panels—all have their limitations," says Daboll. "I think frankly
we just need more innovation."

 

 

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo via @jpenabickley

December 19, 2006No Comments

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo

Picture_8
The debate over which site had the most November page views reflects
the difficulty of tallying Web traffic, and billions of ad dollars are
at stake.  On the Web, the competition for most popular site can be as intense as
the race for the pennant or even the Presidency. So news that
up-and-comer MySpace.com beat incumbent Yahoo! (YHOO) for most monthly page views for the first time in November understandably grabbed headlines.

According to comScore Networks, News Corp.'s (NWS)
MySpace racked up 38.7 billion page views in November, compared with
38.1 billion for longtime leader Yahoo. But the dispatches concerning
the upset were the online equivalent of the famous headline "Dewey
Beats Truman."

Almost immediately, the results were called into question. UBS (UBS)
analyst Benjamin Schachter left voicemail messages for investors and
reporters warning against making decisions on comScore's potentially
unreliable data. Yahoo was still the undisputed leader, measured by
other key metrics, including unique visitors and time spent on the
site. Besides, Nielsen//NetRatings (NTRT),
comScore's main competitor, still had Yahoo leading page views in
November: 33.4 billion, vs. 29 billion for MySpace and the rest of News
Corp.'s Fox Interactive Media properties.

Focusing on Ad Impressions

Picture_9
The discrepancy has revived complaints about the accuracy of
reporting agencies' results, which often differ from companies' own
audience measurements (see BusinessWeek.com, 10/23/06, "Web Numbers: What's Real").
It also underscores the rivalry between comScore and
Nielsen//NetRatings for recognition as the most trusted source for
Web-traffic data. The winner, if one emerges, may set the standard for
how site popularity is measured, influencing how marketers dole out
billions in online ad dollars each year. Recognizing the high stakes in
that tussle, comScore and Nielsen//NetRatings both are refining their
tactics.

For starters, in the first quarter of 2007, comScore plans to change
how it determines the amount of advertising a Web company shows its
audience. To do that, comScore will focus on ad impressions, or the
number of times an ad shows up on a page, rather than the number of
times a Web page is viewed. The results can vary, depending on how a
Web page is designed.

For example, Yahoo and Google (GOOG)
are among companies that use a technology called Ajax that can change
an ad, influencing the number of ad impressions, even if the user
doesn't refresh or click to a different page. Yahoo attributed the 9%
drop in its page views, which allowed MySpace to overtake it, to its
inclusion of Ajax. Thus, page views—long used by industry analysts to
estimate how many ads a company can serve and, thus, potential
revenue—is no longer a reliable measurement.

Time Spent on a Site

ComScore is also planning to launch a set of entirely new ad metrics
in the second quarter of 2007, according to comScore Chief Executive
Officer Magid Abraham. "We are developing some proprietary metrics that
are a much better replacement for page views and are actually a better
measure of engagement," says Abraham.

Abraham is tight-lipped about specifics, but he says the new
techniques will better reflect the influence of new technologies. The
company will focus more on time spent on a site than page views. It's
worth noting that, by that estimate, Yahoo is the clear winner. Its
users spent 42.7 billion minutes on its pages in November. MySpace's
users spent a total of 13.8 billion minutes, says Abraham. 

Nielsen//NetRatings is also working on its measurement techniques in
response to new technologies. The firm developed a proposal several
months ago on how to track Ajax and improve tracking on other
technologies such as streaming media, says Manish Bhatia, NetRatings'
vice-president of global operations and U.S. sales.

Getting Certified

Changing the metrics alone, however, isn't enough to satisfy
everyone. The Interactive Advertising Bureau, an organization of
advertisers and major Web companies, is calling for an external audit
of both comScore and NetRatings by the Media Ratings Council, the body
that certifies measurement practices of media ratings firms such as
radio's Arbitron (ARB).
"At this point, the only thing we know is that the results are
consistently different. What we don't know is why," says Sheryl
Draizen, IAB's senior vice-president and general manager. "The
differences between the numbers reported by comScore and NetRatings are
obviously a big issue for the industry as a whole."

Both comScore and NetRatings say they have begun working with the
MRC to get certified. But Draizen says the process is not happening
fast enough. "It should be a major priority for them," she says. "It is
a real issue to have such different numbers in the marketplace."

For Internet companies and advertisers, determining whose numbers
are correct is more important than just crowning the rightful platform
king. At stake are the tens of billions of advertising dollars destined
for the Web. Internet advertising is estimated to reach $16.4 billion
this year, according to research firm eMarketer. The number is expected
to grow to $25.2 billion in 2010. Which companies get that money,
particularly dollars earmarked for promoting brands and not just
directly selling merchandise, will depend largely on who can verify
their ad inventory and the size, composition, and engagement of their
audience.

May the Best Metric Win

ComScore and NetRatings each believes its own methods the best.
ComScore insists that its method of allowing new measurement methods
will establish it as the clear innovator. It also boasts that it is
able to better measure college students because it offers its software
for download over the Internet in exchange for games, screensavers,
security software and other items. "We feel we have the advantage,"
says Abraham.

Nielsen has an edge with its study panel, which was selected via
random telephone polls and thus, according to Bhatia, more
representative of the general population. He argues that only a
particular kind of computer user is comfortable downloading free
software over the Internet. "Fundamentally, the quality of the result
comes from the quality of the underlying panel," says Bhatia.

Who will win? That will depend largely on who is able to respond
fastest to the new technologies that impair the relevance of old
metrics, says Peter Daboll, a former president of comScore who now
heads Yahoo's global market research department. "Internal server log
data, panels—all have their limitations," says Daboll. "I think frankly
we just need more innovation."

 

 

ON: MySpace Beatdown of Yahoo via @jpenabickley

December 4, 2006No Comments

ON: 07 Mobile Marketing Budgets

Mobile113006
Procter & Gamble, Microsoft Corp. and other major marketers have set
aside a piece of their ad budgets -- albeit a small piece -- for mobile
marketing, representing a "significant shift" for the emerging medium.

Mainstream now
Any money put toward mobile ad platforms last year came from marketers'
discretionary funds, but now mobile marketing is a dedicated line item
in their budgets, Jay Emmit, president of the Americas, mBlox, a global
mobile transaction firm, told some 400 attendees at the 2006 Mobile
Marketing Forum.

"It's a significant shift in the advertising world -- [mobile marketing is] now mainstream; it's out of trial mode," he said.

The banking and financial sectors were responsible for some of the more
innovative uses of the emerging medium in the past year, as when
MasterCard used text messaging as part of its fraud-alert program.
P&G, which won the Mobile Marketing Association's first Overall
Excellence award, has developed the Ad Lab, a program where key
marketing executives on more than a dozen brands have been educated in
mobile opportunities such as mobile video and text messaging. As a
result, a flurry of new efforts and programs will be rolling out from
P&G brands starting next year.

Lingering issues
Still, mobile marketing continues to have
its hangups, Mr. Emmitt said. Mobile companies don't have a foolproof
method of ensuring that ads for sexually explicit material, gambling
and other adult-aimed content will stay off cellphones in the hands of
kids. Wireless carriers led by Sprint have begun to warm up to
providing marketers with targeted mobile advertising opportunities, a
move than may not find fans with privacy advocates.

Marketers and agencies are also demanding better measurement
tools. "I want data," said Eric Bader, senior VP-digital at MediaVest.
There's "not a lot of 'M' in the CPM," meaning there's not a lot of
mobile included in ad rates determined by cost-per-thousand (CPM)
consumers. Another stumbling block to mobile marketing's success is the
inability of marketers and media buyers to buy ads across carriers: In
the current setup, ads with each wireless service provider need to be
negotiated individually.

Kim Olson, marketing director, Sprint Mobile Media Network,
said marketers need to present strong, compelling mobile offers, "not
just put a logo up." She declined to answer a question from the
audience on the carrier's share of ad revenue.

Not so fast
Not all attendees were convinced that mobile has turned the corner.
Courtney Jane Acuff, associate director, Denuo, said many marketers
have not made a commitment to an interactive budget, let alone a
mobile-marketing budget. "There's a big difference between a
discretionary budget and an actual budgeted dollar," she said. Ms.
Acuff added that next year, when the 2008 broadcast TV "upfront"
ad-selling period is conducted, she will watch to see if mobile is
included as part of the offerings. That "will dictate whether mobile is
happening or not," she said. "It didn't happen this year."

A study this month from JupiterResearch found 22% of companies
advertising online also are doing mobile marketing. Overall, the study
predicted mobile ad spending to more than double from a predicted $1.4
billion this year to $2.9 billion in 2011.

A number of the conference's attendees, particularly those
representing the wireless carriers, noted the fragile nature of mobile
marketing in light of the threat that comes from unscrupulous
marketers, such as spammers. "Those in it for the short term: We will
find you all and kick you out and never see you again," said
Christopher Black, director-mobile marketing and interactive media,
Cingular Wireless.

And one conference speaker had some old-fashioned advice based
on lessons learned from the internet's growing pains. "Pop-ups -- don't
do it," cautioned Greg Stuart, president-CEO, Interactive Advertising
Bureau. "Don't let it happen."

ON: 07 Mobile Marketing Budgets via @jpenabickley

November 26, 2006No Comments

ON: The Myth of the Inventory Drought

We hear it all the time: there’s a scarcity of inventory for online
video advertisers. Although it seems to be the prevailing wisdom, it’s
simply not true.  According to the Interactive Advertising Bureau, the top 50 sites
account for 94% of all online ad spending. Some quick
back-of-the-envelope calculations reveal a significant surfeit of great
sites with an enormous amount of available inventory that are part of
that remaining 6%–outside the top 50. There’s certainly a lot to be
said for the benefits of advertising on top sites, but 94% is just a
ridiculous number.

Clearly, the “destination” sites–the networks and the portals–are
selling out their video inventory, but in many cases that inventory is
being thrown in with the TV buy. Then we have the “mid-tail” and the
“long-tail.” As more and more small and medium-sized Web publishers
bring video content online, inventory is exploding. And many of these
sites are using video in nontraditional ways.

According to comScore, in both July and August of this year, 7 billion
videos were streamed in the U.S. But according to Accustream, in July
the available pre-roll marketplace was just over a billion streams. And
that billion is highly concentrated on a few large sites.

Shorter ads (:7 - :10) that are designed specifically for online video
opportunities create a better user experience and are driving
publishers to continue to add in-stream advertising to their video
content en masse.

Effective use of video doesn’t necessarily have to be pre-roll. Many
advertisers are finding in-banner video to be extremely compelling.
There is certainly no limit to the inventory for in-banner video ads,
and many marketers find that the level of engagement that’s available
with in-banner video generates a significant brand boost.

Engaging post-roll is an effective option–and as more and more
long-form video comes online, multiple mid-roll ads increase the number
of ads slots that are available. Many advertisers are also finding
successful placements with video sponsorships.

New technologies and formats that are developing (e.g., video chats
with ads included, online games with video ads before and between
scenes) all add to the potential volume of inventory. And for
advertisers lacking video assets, there are still ways to take
advantage, including building flash ads to play in video spots.

Finally, there’s the explosion of consumer-generated video. Although it
scares most marketers to lose their brand in the world of
user-generated, still with the usage of behavioral targeting
technology, it’s possible to find in-market consumers.

Inventory scarcity? Drought of online video ad avails? Not at all. Just
a lack of creativity. It’s time to wake up to the huge opportunity
that’s available beyond the top few sites. It’s time to look at the
long tail, because that’s where the volume of video inventory is
waiting to be discovered.

ON: The Myth of the Inventory Drought via @jpenabickley

November 1, 2006No Comments

ON: Brand Safety & Media Buys

Have you ever created an Ad, placed your buys and then watched the numbers grow as your audience grew?  I have.  I have also witnessed brands place a buy with their agency who in turn take that ad money and place the buy with multiple ad networks, who then take the brand buy and place them on “strategically” sound publishers.  Then the fun happens when your client calls and says he has found the ad next to porn, consumer generated content or better yet hate messages.   

At a recent IAB meeting I was holding court over cocktails on the subject of Brand Safety in the incestuous world of blind networks and disreputable publishers.

The online ad network industry has evolved from horizontal or blind ad networks running client's campaigns alongside inappropriate content to Vertical Ad Networks where the media buyer and the client know exactly where their ads are running-- in an environment of high composition audiences. The efficiency of this is obvious.

But as the industry evolves and 40% of the networks are working in the vertical and 60% are working in the horizontal, how do brands protect themselves from running on inappropriate content? 

I ponder this industry issue as we run into the future of online video content.  I believe that it will begin to grow incredibly unpleasant for brands that spend millions on a 15 sec spot and find that spot on content that has not been categorized or rated by an independent organization (like the ESRB or MPAA).

As interactive media buys have grown over the years we are seeing more and more instances of brand advertising showing up on “sketch” websites.

Did you know that one in every five online ads is running on a "blind" network?

The UK IAB and an independent organization made up of ad networks / Internet ad sales houses have joined to create a “Code of Conduct”

Picture_5_4

 

Today, I ask that we as an industry begin a coalition that protects our advertisers and brands while categorizing and rating content on the Internet.  That way, when an advertiser places a buy they can run on rated content, just as they do on cable TV.

The purpose is to categorize and set ratings, NOT to ban content from the Internet.

Imagine the benefits to the brands and the inevitable benefits to consumers if we were to all use a common language and rating system.  Utopia.  As many of you know this is something that is long overdue in the Internet industry.

I welcome comments, suggestions and other who will me to join me in this endeavor.


Digg!

ON: Brand Safety & Media Buys via @jpenabickley

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