As many of you know one of my favorite things is adding my years of consumer site and media testing experience to the design of web brands.  More and more often, When I sit down to ideate and create I try to find relevant examples that prove the best use of the space combined with knowledge of best Web 2.0 practices and, ultimately, the ability
to build usable sites.

Now, after a weeks of designing a sites that I feel good about,  I take a step back and realize that sometimes those three things
combined, to most clients, sounds ideal.  But the result seems to produce results that are, to use a metaphor, like plain yogurt. A
lot of people like plain yogurt and I'd say that plain yogurt is the
safest of flavors, but it is tough to get passionate, sassy or even evangelize plain yogurt. You
can put toppings on it, you can mash other things into it, but it is
still plain yogurt.

The same can be said of most marketing campaigns.  Now port that into the Web 2.0 world where presentation layer programing allows us some of the most flexibility of true design that I have ever seen. (remember I date back to text links for design)

I think that this is the difference between usability and user
experience.  I know that many people in the industry, particularly those
in the field of user experience (including myself) , have been working to better define the
difference, however, that definition has failed to reach the
client-side decision-makers as well as the majority of agency side creatives. They continue to ask for usability and for
in-industry best practices.

Here is the difference: User eXPerience is focused on ensuring that the
targeted user gets the best experience possible based on the desired
outcome for that user. For example, a user gets through a
shopping cart without obstruction (in this case, it would be easy to
say that the cart was "usable"). That is pretty straightforward and
common; we optimize regularly to tighten a checkout process.  In an UXP world we are looking for a "net - net " take away.

With a usability focus, you might
provide your users with a different function that pairs them with their
desired menu items much more quickly, but we know, from analytics, that
they're going to get there and we need them to know something that may
improve their experience with the site in the future. Ideally,
that is user experience.

I fell in love with User eXPerience after reading my integrated marketing textbook from Kellogg.  There were so many examples of how to improve a user experience through innovation, flow and design of the key objectives.  As most of you know I am generally brought in to clean up messy, flat or unthoughtful user experiences.  That is my job.  A fresh set of innovative eyes with the power to revamp and relaunch.

Recently, I was highlighting the experience design for a site we are building.
I had defensible statistics for just about everything; however, there
was an audience member who simply could not break away from "web 1.0 practices of lots of clicking/digging to get to a tertiary objective of the site.  It is those old school web design practices that do not allow the user to multi-task in one interface.  In my opinion we were setting up the entire experience to
be plain yogurt. And for a site with so much exposure they cannot afford plain yogurt they need a Tasty Freeze.

A persons experience can always
be improved, and there is definitely room for usability improvements in
all work product. However, we need to step back and ensure that a usability
enhancement doesn't diminish the brand, nor does it minimize the
overall experience. If we simply focused on in-industry (or competitive) best practices and pure
usability (boring), we would end up with sites that mirror one another rather
than deliver an experience that best reflects the company or campaign. Consumers
would find it difficult to differentiate a brand best connected with on
a more personal or emotional level.

Think about the real-world and notice the unique feel of each of
these brand experiences: Target compared to Walmart, Best Buy to
Circuit City, Dean and Deluca to Starbucks. These are pretty obvious examples of how experience
differentiates a brand.  now take that to the web where anything is possible and access is unlimited.

So here is my request to
those of who manage brands and interactive departments - quit being a follower. don't design a web site.  develop a brand experience.  LEAD.  Leading is risky - but the pay off is usually paved with rich results.

My Advise: "KNOW THYSELF" - Socrates   "Know Thy Brand" - Mark Gobe

Know your customer
and consider his/her experience and what you want his branded takeaway to
be.
How do you want your core consumer to feel?

ON: eXPerince Design Best Practices Lead To Rich Results via @jpenabickley